CMA Flashback: Female Vocalist of the Year

For a look back at the other major categories, visit our CMA Awards page.

2010

  • Miranda Lambert
  • Martina McBride
  • Reba McEntire
  • Taylor Swift
  • Carrie Underwood

For the first time since 1991, the same five women are nominated in this category for the second consecutive year.  Lambert won the prize at this year’s ACM Awards, and with nine nominations this year, she seems like the front-runner.

2009

  • Miranda Lambert
  • Martina McBride
  • Reba McEntire
  • Taylor Swift
  • Carrie Underwood

In an interesting year, three of the all-time champions in the category (McBride, McEntire, Underwood) faced off against two high-profile artists who had yet to win (Lambert, Swift.) Despite Underwood’s continued popularity and the warm critical reception for Lambert’s work,  the undeniable success of Swift led to her first victory.

carrie underwood2008

  • Alison Krauss
  • Miranda Lambert
  • Martina McBride
  • Taylor Swift
  • Carrie Underwood

Carrie Underwood joined the ranks of Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, Martina McBride and Reba McEntire by winning three Female Vocalist awards, and she now trails only McBride and McEntire in total wins. Amazingly, Underwood was only on her second studio album when she won her third trophy.

2007

  • Alison Krauss
  • Miranda Lambert
  • Martina McBride
  • Reba McEntire
  • Carrie Underwood

Carrie Underwood’s second victory established that she wasn’t a flash in the pan or a flavor of the month in the view of the CMA.  She became the twelfth woman in history to win this award twice, and the only one to do so on the strength of her debut album.     As historically impressive as that may sound, it really was no contest.   She outsold the rest of the category combined, and dominated radio at the same time.

2006

  • Sara Evans
  • Faith Hill
  • Martina McBride
  • Carrie Underwood
  • Gretchen Wilson

Underwood was among the most shocked in the audience when she won Female Vocalist of the Year, not long after winning Horizon Award the same night. Underwood was the first artist to win both Horizon and their own vocal category since the Dixie Chicks in 1998. The feat was also accomplished by Alison Krauss (1995) and Ricky Skaggs (1982). It could be argued that Underwood pulling it off was most impressive: Krauss was already an established bluegrass star with a greatest hits album in 1995, Ricky Skaggs was well-known as a member of Emmylou Harris’ Hot Band, and the Chicks won the far less competitive Vocal Group category.

2005

  • Sara Evans
  • Alison Krauss
  • Martina McBride
  • Gretchen Wilson
  • Lee Ann Womack

Wilson rode the massive success of her debut album to a precocious win in this category, topping even Lee Ann Womack, who won three other awards the same night. Voters were clearly looking for an alternative to McBride, who’d won the previous three years. Evans might’ve pulled it off if “Suds in the Bucket” hadn’t been followed up with “Tonight”, a beautiful song that surprisingly bombed at radio. She lost a bit of momentum because of it. I would’ve picked Krauss this year.

2004

  • Terri Clark
  • Sara Evans
  • Alison Krauss
  • Martina McBride
  • Reba McEntire

Reba was nominated for the first time in nine years, but other than that, this category was a snoozer. An entire nation yawned as Martina McBride won for the fourth time, tying Reba McEntire’s record of four wins. Frankly, Terri Clark was more deserving.

2003

  • Terri Clark
  • Alison Krauss
  • Patty Loveless
  • Martina McBride
  • Dolly Parton

McBride repeated in a year when women disappeared from country radio. Parton was nominated for the first time since 1987, and Loveless for the first time since 1998, on the strength of roots albums that received no airplay; Krauss garnered nary a spin herself. That only two of the women – McBride and Clark – were having hits at radio was unprecedented for this category.

2002

  • Sara Evans
  • Alison Krauss
  • Martina McBride
  • Lee Ann Womack
  • Trisha Yearwood

Nobody knew what the CMA would do this year. The turnover in this category had been amazing – nine different winners in the last eleven years, with no woman winning more than twice, or returning to win again. McBride made CMA history when she reclaimed the trophy three years after winning it for the first time, the first woman to do so since Loretta Lynn in 1972.

2001

  • Sara Evans
  • Faith Hill
  • Martina McBride
  • Lee Ann Womack
  • Trisha Yearwood

A year after winning Single of the Year for “I Hope You Dance”, Womack returned to win for female vocalist. There was some buzz that Yearwood might win it, or that Evans, riding “Born to Fly”, could win her first time out, but voters rewarded Womack for the traditionalist music that they’d loved since she first hit the scene.

2000

  • Faith Hill
  • Martina McBride
  • Jo Dee Messina
  • Lee Ann Womack
  • Trisha Yearwood

Even though she had six nominations that evening, Hill was facing a backlash over going pop. As the Dixie Chicks swept four of her categories, and her husband collected his second Male Vocalist trophy, Hill stunned the audience when she acknowledged the controversy in her acceptance speech, declaring that her heart was still with country music.

1999

  • Faith Hill
  • Martina McBride
  • Jo Dee Messina
  • Shania Twain
  • Trisha Yearwood

Martina rode the massive success of Evolution to her first win in this category, topping crossover stars Faith Hill and Shania Twain, the latter of which won Entertainer of the Year the same night. Messina, a first-time nominee, took home the Horizon Award, making it a good night for three of the nominees.

1998

  • Faith Hill
  • Patty Loveless
  • Martina McBride
  • Lee Ann Womack
  • Trisha Yearwood

Yearwood became the first woman to repeat in the category since Mary Chapin Carpenter five years earlier, and she accepted via satellite, as she was performing with Garth Brooks in Europe.

1997

  • Deana Carter
  • Patty Loveless
  • LeAnn Rimes
  • Pam Tillis
  • Trisha Yearwood

The drama of the dueling “How Do I Live” singles loomed large, and Yearwood emerged victorious over her then-nemesis, LeAnn Rimes, who received her only nomination to date that year.

1996

  • Faith Hill
  • Patty Loveless
  • Martina McBride
  • Pam Tillis
  • Shania Twain

Last year’s winner, Alison Krauss, failed to secure a nomination in 1996. Also out of the running, after thirteen consecutive nominations, was Reba McEntire. Shattering sales records didn’t stop Shania Twain from going home empty-handed, but along with Faith Hill and Martina McBride, she did get her first nomination. The only hold-overs from 1995 were Pam Tillis and Patty Loveless. After winning Album of the Year in 1995, Loveless was widely predicted to take home this trophy, getting the award on her fifth try.

1995

  • Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Alison Krauss
  • Patty Loveless
  • Reba McEntire
  • Pam Tillis

While most pundits predicted a repeat victory for Tillis or a first win for Patty Loveless, Alison Krauss made a shocking sweep of the CMA’s, winning Single, Horizon, Vocal Event and Female Vocalist. She wouldn’t receive another nomination in any category for four years, but has returned to prominence in recent years, becoming a regular nominee and winner at the awards.

1994

  • Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Reba McEntire
  • Pam Tillis
  • Wynonna
  • Trisha Yearwood

Pam Tillis was the only one surprised by her victory in 1994, as the critic’s darling rode the success of her Sweetheart’s Dance project to a Female Vocalist trophy.

1993

  • Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Reba McEntire
  • Pam Tillis
  • Tanya Tucker
  • Wynonna

Despite intense competition from the massively successful Wynonna, Mary Chapin Carpenter repeated in the category, as Come On Come On continued to churn out hits.

1992

  • Mary Chapin Carpenter
  • Reba McEntire
  • Tanya Tucker
  • Wynonna
  • Trisha Yearwood

It was hard to read the tea leaves in 1992. Tucker, McEntire and Wynonna were also up for Album, Carpenter was nominated for Single and Yearwood was also a Horizon nominee. McEntire was up for Entertainer. There was clearly wide support for all five women, but Carpenter, a D.C. folkie with a razor-sharp wit, took home the prize.

1991

  • Patty Loveless
  • Kathy Mattea
  • Reba McEntire
  • Lorrie Morgan
  • Tanya Tucker

Talk about overdue. Tanya Tucker won on her seventh try, having lost the previous three years, and three other years in the mid-70’s.

1990

  • Patty Loveless
  • Kathy Mattea
  • Reba McEntire
  • Lorrie Morgan
  • Tanya Tucker

Mattea not only won her second trophy in this category, but also watched her husband, Jon Vezner, take home Song of the Year for her signature hit, “Where’ve You Been.”

1989

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Patty Loveless
  • Kathy Mattea
  • Reba McEntire
  • Tanya Tucker

Sixth time was not a charm for Rosanne Cash, despite having six #1 hits in the past two years and last year’s champ, K.T. Oslin, not being in the running. Voters embraced Mattea, who had won Single the previous year for “Eighteen Wheels & A Dozen Roses.”

1988

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Kathy Mattea
  • Reba McEntire
  • K.T. Oslin
  • Tanya Tucker

Oslin ended the record-setting four-year run of Reba McEntire, and made history of her own the same night, becoming the first woman to win Song of the Year, for “80’s Ladies.”

1987

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Kathy Mattea
  • Reba McEntire
  • Dolly Parton

McEntire broke the three-win record shared by Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette as she collected her fourth trophy for Female Vocalist. Harris received the last of twelve consecutive nominations, though she would go on to win many more Grammys and share the Album of the Year trophy in 2001.

1986

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Janie Fricke
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Reba McEntire
  • Anne Murray

Reba McEntire not only became the first woman to win three in a row since Tammy Wynette, but also the fourth woman to win Entertainer of the Year; it would be another thirteen years before another woman accomplished the feat.

1985

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Janie Fricke
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Reba McEntire
  • Anne Murray

McEntire repeated in a year without much competition.

1984

  • Janie Fricke
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Reba McEntire
  • Anne Murray

On an evening where Anne Murray seemed to be sweeping, having already picked up Single and Album honors, a shocked and crying McEntire collected her first Female Vocalist trophy.

1983

  • Lacy J. Dalton
  • Janie Fricke
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Reba McEntire

Fricke won her second consecutive trophy, on the strength of the hit singles “It Ain’t Easy Bein’ Easy” and “He’s a Heartache (Looking for a Place to Happen)”.

1982

  • Rosanne Cash
  • Janie Fricke
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Juice Newton

Major units were being moved by newcomers Cash and Newton, but voters went with Fricke, a former background singer for many hit artists who became a star in her own right.

1981

  • Terri Gibbs
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Anne Murray

Mandrell won in 1979, and though she didn’t win in 1980, she did collect Entertainer of the Year. In 1981, she took her second trophy in both categories, becoming the first artist to ever win two Entertainer trophies.

1980

  • Crystal Gayle
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Anne Murray

Perennial nominee Emmylou Harris finally won, as a pure country album (Blue Kentucky Girl) followed by a bluegrass set (Roses in the Snow) finally erased concerns that she was more rock than country.

1979

  • Janie Fricke
  • Crystal Gayle
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Anne Murray

A smoky cover of “(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want To Be Right” and her signature hit “Sleeping Single in a Double Bed” helped Mandrell take her first Female Vocalist award home, after ten years of charting hits at country radio.

1978

  • Janie Fricke
  • Crystal Gayle
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Dolly Parton

Gayle became a crossover star on her way to her second Female Vocalist award, as “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue” exploded at both country and pop radio. She followed with two more major hits – “Talking In Your Sleep” and “Ready For the Times to Get Better”.

1977

  • Crystal Gayle
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Dolly Parton

Loretta Lynn was nominated in the same year as her little sister Crystal Gayle for the first time, and the younger sibling emerged triumphant.

1976

  • Crystal Gayle
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Barbara Mandrell
  • Dolly Parton
  • Tammy Wynette

Despite a lukewarm year at radio, Parton repeated in the category. Perhaps voters continued to reward her because she’d been overlooked for way too long in the past.

1975

  • Jessi Colter
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Linda Ronstadt
  • Tanya Tucker

Parton finally won with her seventh nomination, on the strength of “The Bargain Store” and “The Seeker”, two of her best self-written hits.

1974

  • Loretta Lynn
  • Anne Murray
  • Olivia Newton-John
  • Dolly Parton
  • Tanya Tucker

Easily the most controversial win in this category’s history, many Nashville artists fumed and formed their own rival organization to the CMA’s, all in anger over the transplanted Aussie Olivia Newton-John winning the award. Blissfully unaware of the controversy, Newton-John would go on to win two Grammys just months later in the pop categories.

1973

  • Donna Fargo
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Jeanne Pruett
  • Tanya Tucker
  • Tammy Wynette

Even though Lynn had been having hits since 1960, the bulk of her #1 hits came in the seventies. The CMA awarded her for a third time in this category, matching Tammy Wynette’s record.

1972

  • Donna Fargo
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Connie Smith
  • Tammy Wynette

The big news wasn’t Lynn returning after five years to win again in this category, though it may have been if that feat wasn’t overshadowed by her winning Entertainer of the Year, becoming the first woman to win in CMA history. It’s still a rarity today, with only six female acts in forty years pulling it off.

1971

  • Lynn Anderson
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Sammi Smith
  • Tammy Wynette

Her massive hit “Rose Garden” powered Anderson to a win on her fifth try. Fellow nominee Sammi Smith would take home Single for “Help Me Make It Through the Night” in the same year.

1970

  • Lynn Anderson
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Connie Smith
  • Tammy Wynette

Wynette continued to own country radio and this category, winning for a third time in as many years.

1969

  • Lynn Anderson
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Jeannie C. Riley
  • Tammy Wynette

Wynette scored the biggest hit of her career with “Stand By Your Man”, and followed it up with two more #1 hits, securing her place as the biggest female artist of the late sixties.

1968

  • Lynn Anderson
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Dolly Parton
  • Jeannie C. Riley
  • Tammy Wynette

Riley took home Single of the Year for “Harper Valley P.T.A.”, while Wynette took the crown for Female Vocalist, on the strength of the classic singles “I Don’t Wanna Play House” and “D-I-V-O-R-C-E.”

1967

  • Lynn Anderson
  • Loretta Lynn
  • Connie Smith
  • Dottie West
  • Tammy Wynette

In the fifteen months before the very first CMA Awards, Loretta Lynn released both “You Ain’t Woman Enough” and “Don’t Come Home A-Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)”, making this category an easy call for the very first CMA voters.

Facts & Feats

Multiple Wins:

  • (4) – Martina McBride, Reba McEntire
  • (3) – Loretta Lynn, Carrie Underwood, Tammy Wynette
  • (2) – Mary Chapin Carpenter, Janie Fricke, Crystal Gayle, Kathy Mattea, Barbara Mandrell, Dolly Parton, Trisha Yearwood

Most Consecutive Wins:

  • (4) – Reba McEntire (1984-1987)
  • (3) – Martina McBride (2002-2004), Carrie Underwood (2006-2008),  Tammy Wynette (1968-1970)

Most Nominations:

  • (17) – Reba McEntire
  • (14) – Martina McBride
  • (12) – Emmylou Harris, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton
  • (9) – Barbara Mandrell, Tanya Tucker
  • (8) – Patty Loveless, Tammy Wynette, Trisha Yearwood
  • (7) – Janie Fricke, Alison Krauss, Anne Murray
  • (6) – Rosanne Cash, Faith Hill
  • (5) – Lynn Anderson, Sara Evans, Crystal Gayle, Kathy Mattea, Pam Tillis, Lee Ann Womack

Most Nominations Without a Win:

  • (7) – Anne Murray
  • (6) – Rosanne Cash
  • (5) – Sara Evans
  • (3) – Miranda Lambert, Connie Smith, Wynonna
  • (2) – Terri Clark, Donna Fargo, Lorrie Morgan, Jeannie C. Riley,  Shania Twain, Carrie Underwood

Winners in First Year of Nomination:
Mary Chapin Carpenter (1992), Alison Krauss (1995), Olivia Newton-John (1974), K. T. Oslin (1988), Gretchen Wilson (2005), Carrie Underwood (2006)

CMA Female Vocalists of the Year Who Have Never Won the ACM Award:
Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Olivia Newton-John, Taylor Swift, Pam Tillis, Tanya Tucker, Lee Ann Womack

ACM Female Vocalists of the Year Who Have Never Won the CMA Award:
Donna Fargo (1973), Sylvia (1983), Wynonna (1994), Sara Evans (2006), Miranda Lambert (2010)

CMA Female Vocalists Who Have Also Won the Grammy for Best Country Vocal Performance, Female:
Lynn Anderson, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Crystal Gayle, Faith Hill, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Kathy Mattea, Reba McEntire, K.T. Oslin, Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood, Gretchen Wilson, Tammy Wynette, Trisha Yearwood

Winners of the Grammy for Best Country Vocal Performance, Female That Have Never Won the CMA Female Vocalist Award:
Rosanne Cash, June Carter Cash, Donna Fargo, k.d. lang, Jodi Miller, Anne Murray, Juice Newton, Jeannie C. Riley, Linda Ronstadt, Jeannie Seely, Sammi Smith, Dottie West, Shania Twain

Women Who Have Won All Three Industry Vocalist Awards:
Lynn Anderson, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Crystal Gayle, Faith Hill, Kathy Mattea, Reba McEntire, K.T. Oslin, Dolly Parton, Carrie Underwood, Gretchen Wilson, Tammy Wynette, Trisha Yearwood

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27 Comments

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27 Responses to CMA Flashback: Female Vocalist of the Year

  1. Leeann WardNo Gravatar

    This may be the category that I’m most interested to watch. Of course, I’m personally rooting for Lambert, but would be fine with Krauss or Underwood as well.

  2. Realistically speaking, I think Underwood’s got it on lock here, though I’d love to be proven wrong. It seems like the Vocalist category historically tends to reward commercial success first and foremost – I’m reminded of the year when Lee Ann Womack picked up seemingly everything but the Vocalist trophy for There’s More Where That Came From. My CMA knowledge can’t match Kevin’s, though, so again, I don’t mind being wrong there.

  3. Blake BoldtNo Gravatar

    I would agree (gulp) with Dan. Although I was certainly surprised when Womack lost in 2000 to Faith Hill, who, despite her improved vocal abilities, is not quite in Womack’s class. It seems that the CMA made up for that decision in 2001, a free-for-all year.

    Underwood is the favorite, but Lambert makes the most interesting music of the five and Krauss is clearly an A-class vocalist and ambassador for country music. My personal preference would be Lambert, although Underwood’s dominance on record shelves and radio is hard to deny.

    Although CMA voters are supposed to judge year-by-year, it would pain me a little to see Underwood win again. That would mark three consecutive victories, and only 4 women have won that many in total. Carrie’s a terrific vocalist, and I know that the field has been thinner this decade, but it seems like a lot of praise. I feel the same way about Martina McBride in the early part of the decade. Contrast this with artists such as Krauss, Patty Loveless and Emmylou Harris who prevailed a single time, and Roseanne Cash, who’s the most notable woman never to win.

    I know awards rarely mean more than a hill of beans, but that’s just my opinion. I’d have a hard time picking against Underwood.

  4. MarcNo Gravatar

    2005. The year voters discovered mass quantities of drugs in a field near Nashville.

  5. Paul W DennisNo Gravatar

    Probably Underwood although I think that Lambert is due for a little love from the CMA

  6. This will be between Underwood and Krauss with me wondering if Taylor Swift won’t somehow conjure a way to win this award.

  7. AaronNo Gravatar

    I agree with Dan…Carrie has the award locked in her favor. I would be surprised (though pleasantly) if Miranda walked away with it, but based on radio and record sales, it’s definitely Carrie’s to lose.

    I’m a big Carrie fan and I’m rooting for her, but like everyone else, I wouldn’t mind seeing Miranda win…only if Carrie takes home Album because a winless year for Carrie, in my opinion, just wouldn’t be right.

  8. ElevenNo Gravatar

    Krauss … then Underwood, IMO.

    Re: Martina’s nod …. that is what bores me about the CMA’s, every year they actually only have maybe 2-3 open spots at the most cuz they get so hooked on THE. SAME. PERFORMERS. and refuse to broaden their scope.
    Yeah, Martina’s got a great voice but for this past year???
    I know… don’t overthink it. ;-)

  9. vpNo Gravatar

    I think CU deserves and should ger the award, but with the way the voting has gone this far just to get the people on the ticket nothing would surprise me, ok maybe if TS won that would surprise me the make me lose all faith in the country music industry.

  10. vpNo Gravatar

    I’d be just as happy seeing ML win too!!!

  11. ScottNo Gravatar

    I’d like to see Carrie win, and I think she will. Just on te strength of “Just a Dream” she turned in a better vocal peformance than any female this year. And if she does win it for a 3rd time, it puts her in some really great company.
    and Suprise..ML is growing on me just a little (it just kinda happened the other day when ly local station played “Famous in a small town”, and “Me and charlie Talking” back to back, so i wouldnt be totally disappointed if she won.

    Martina would be a good pick too, but i figure she’s got a snowball’s chance..ditto allison

    Taylor..not yet, but I look for her to win it maybe 2 or 3 years.

  12. dudleyNo Gravatar

    Kevin, Taylor Swift isn’t entirely without major label backing. Big Machine has worked out a distribution deal with Universal Music Group, which is one of the big four labels. I know UMG is handling Taylor’s Pop market and retail promotion. Not sure if that would at all impact how the country staff at the label would vote, though.

    Between her live performances and her overall impact, I think Carrie deserves this one. I think it’s next year that someone else will win in this category. There’s a pretty good chance that Miranda will have a new album out during the eligibility period, and Martina is likely to have a new album out early next year.

  13. Kent

    Carrie Underwood still seems to be the queen to me, and I like her, so she’s got my vote. I wouldn’t be disappointed if Taylor Swift won, since Should’ve Said No is my fav. single by anyone this year, but I doubt she’ll take it. I like Gunpowder & Lead, but that’s about where my support for Miranda ends. I won’t be sad if she wins it, but I think Carrie is more deserving.

  14. ZachNo Gravatar

    underwood or lmbert.

  15. Other than this site (which I would love to believe without question in this case), are there other sources of buzz for this supposed groundswell of support for Lambert in this race?

    Because, while Lambert would certainly get my vote for making what is easily the most compelling work of the nominees, I’m just not convinced that anyone other than Underwood will win here. Her lengthy awards-show dominance has to come to an end sometime, but I think that’s more likely to occur at the Grammys this year than at the CMAs, where the nominations reflect that voters were largely sticking with the safe and familiar.

    A win for Swift would be some kind of nightmare, but it’s clear that the CMA voters aren’t as keen on her as many predicted they would be. But I can at least understand Swift’s nomination: Krauss’ solo work from this past year pales in comparison to her high-profile collaborations and McBride’s nomination is almost impossible to justify.

    That leaves Lambert as perhaps the most logical choice for an upset, but I just wonder why an upset seems like such a strong possibility.

  16. Blake BoldtNo Gravatar

    I believe we’d all agree that Underwood is the favorite, but would also reckon that Lambert is the “critic’s” pick and the most suitable alternative to Carrie’s dominance. As I said before, I would have a hard time picking against Underwood with the awards criteria the way it stands. She’s the most successful touring artist of the five, she’s the greatest force at retail and she owns an impressive set of pipes to boot. Lambert inspires quite a bit of passion, though, for finally breaking the boundaries of radio and continuing to be the most artistically developed singer of the bunch in the last year.

  17. Leeann WardNo Gravatar

    Jonathan,

    While I’d love for Lambert to win, I don’t have much inclination that she will. So, I think those of us who want her to win aren’t saying that we actually think that it’s “a strong possibility.” I think Underwood will take it.

  18. I think the only way that Lambert wins is if the label throws its votes behind her instead of Underwood, and I don’t see that happening.

    Even if they did, Underwood has a lot more support among the publishing companies because she writes her own material, but the non-affiliated voters could go heavily for Lambert. I think Lambert’s the only one who could conceivably win other than Underwood, but it’s not very likely.

  19. ElevenNo Gravatar

    I agree, “Just a Dream” is really a highlight for Carrie.
    Going out on a limb here… I think she gets it this year. ;-)

  20. GavinNo Gravatar

    If you list all the accomplishments for Miss Underwood during the eligibility period it really isn’t a contest. I think that Carrie’s domination of the category last year makes this year a little more interesting because some of the other nominees, Taylor Swift especially, closed the gap commercially and had successful years in their own right. But how many artists including the men can claim over two million units sold, three number one singles (co-writes), already playing to over 700,000 fans during her co headliner and her own Carnival Ride tour and she still has 51 dates remaining and to top that off she becomes currently the youngest member of the Grand Ole Opry. Not to mention being the lone representative of the genre in numerous television specials and charity events through out the year. Did I miss anything? For someone else to walk away with the FVA other than Miss Underwood would be the biggest upset in CMA history. For me it’s a walk.

  21. vpNo Gravatar

    very good case Gavin. plus she broke the record with her first seven singles all going #1 and possibly 8 with JAD. CU or ML would be great but pretty sure it will Be CU with all her acheivments this year, on our radio stations they are calling her the new generation queen of country, the tide turns quickly in this biz.

  22. Claire

    i think carrie is a lock for this the only thing that could stop her to win this is that she would have 3 cma female vocalist in a row and that would put her in the elite i dont think tha cma are quit ready for that

  23. Jalon WattsNo Gravatar

    It’s really funny, how Underwood gets flipped no crap about winning 3 times now, but the sensational McBride get flipped crap about winning in 2004, and also tying McEntire for most wins. “Eleven,” You might be right about CMA only opening about 3 stpots each year, but McBride deserves everyone of the nominations she gets. I don’t believe CMA should give 3 open spots for these new-comers, when they have got to earn the nomination, more than just come in here, sing a song and win. I think that is bogus. McBride has simply been in this business for more than 15 years, and is not appreciated enoughfrom ACM, so I believe that CMA should give McBride the most awards for this category. Plus, McBride is the only Female Vocalist that have songs with so much heart and deepness, that they ca ake you cry. Sure a good love song is great, but that’s all Swift sings. McBride experements, with all different types of songs, and that’s why she is not only a unique performer, but she is also a terrific vocalist. She has proved that year after year. Give me an example of who should have been nominated instead of McBride. Maybe instead, yo should write CMA a letter about expanding the categor to 6 people, if you are going to gripe about them only leaving 3 spots open every year. Think this over while you are writing me back, and maybe it will come to you, the commenly known sense that McBride is a fantastic performer, and is in no way “over-rated.”

  24. Cutting the TreacleNo Gravatar

    Jalon Watts – ” . . . gets flipped no crap . . . get flipped crap”

    Me: I have never heard of flipping crap, but I will attempt to use this phrase at least 3 times tomorrow.

  25. Jalon WattsNo Gravatar

    Cutting the Treacle-” You’ve never heard it. Tht’s kindove wierd… where are you from? I say it all of the time.

  26. JoJoNo Gravatar

    Hope Carrie wins it this year!