A Tale of Two Tributes: Alabama

Alabama-Friends

Various Artists
Alabama & Friends

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To recognize the impact that Alabama has had on modern country music, you could consider their millions of albums sold, their hundreds of awards, their many #1 songs or their induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2005. You could also look at how the boys from Fort Payne, Ala. have the distinction of bringing something entirely new into country music.

Prior to Alabama, country music was predominantly a land of solo acts, with the occasional superstar duos (Conway & Loretta, George & Tammy) or backing bands (The Strangers, The Buckaroos) thrown in for good measure. Sure, there were plenty of vocal groups (Statler Brothers, Oak Ridge Boys), but actual bands, who played their own instruments, were few and far between in country music. It took Alabama to break down that particular barrier, and they paved the way for groups like Zac Brown Band, Diamond Rio, Eli Young Band and others.

Alabama is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a reunion tour and a couple of well-deserved tribute albums. The tributes are quite different, with one being done under the direction of the band, and the other a completely independent effort.

Alabama & Friends, featuring many of today’s leading country stars, comes off as less of a tribute album and more of an Alabama-themed celebrity karaoke night. Many of the songs have very similar arrangements to the originals, and even include Randy Owen, Jeff Cook and Teddy Gentry on lead and harmony vocals.

Many of the memorable elements from the original songs are still present. The fiddle breakdown in “Tennessee River” (with Jason Aldean), the tempo changes in “My Home’s in Alabama” (with Jamey Johnson) – they’re all present and accounted for. The songs that stick close to the originals aren’t necessarily bad. Luke Bryan, for instance, has plenty of flaws as a country singer, but his vocal abilities are not in question, so his version of “Love in the First Degree” is solid. The same could be said of Jason Aldean’s take on “Tennessee River” and Toby Keith’s “She and I.” There’s nothing wrong with them, but fans who love the Alabama originals might think the new ones are a bit too by-the-book.

There are a few instances where the guest singers step outside the box and add more of their own personality to the recording. Trisha Yearwood, the only female voice on the project, does a lovely job on “Forever’s as Far as I’ll Go,” and “Lady Down on Love” by Kenny Chesney stands among his best vocal performances. The same can’t be said of Florida Georgia Line, who takes “I’m in a Hurry (and Don’t Know Why),” adds their usual amount of noise and clutter to the mix, and makes it sound like every other Florida Georgia Line song ever recorded. While it’s a rare opportunity to hear both Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley sing lead vocals, it raises the issue of whether or not they’ve already run out of original ideas.

Alabama recorded two songs for the first time in 11 years, but they’re the weakest songs on the album. For a band that was one of the first to successfully blend country music with amped-up Southern rock, “That’s How I Was Raised” and “All American” are low-energy, generic rah-rah country disappointments.

high-cotton-tribute-to-alabama-2013

Various Artists
High Cotton: A Tribute to Alabama

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High Cotton: A Tribute to Alabama, is available from Lightning Rod Records and has a collection of Americana/Red Dirt/indie all-stars doing their takes on Alabama hits. There is some overlap with the Alabama & Friends, but these versions have a bit more of an original feel. “Why Lady Why” gets transformed into a smoldering soul tune by JD McPherson, while Jason Isbell and John Paul White of The Civil Wars completely reinvent “Old Flame.” The Turnpike Troubadours and Shonna Tucker provide a spark with “If You’re Gonna Play in Texas (You Gotta Have a Fiddle in the Band)” and “Roll On (Eighteen Wheeler),” respectively. While neither version is light years from the original, they add energy to a project that leans heavily toward slow and reflective songs.

Two of Alabama’s love songs are recast as duets. While it’s startling to hear Todd Snider as a romantic balladeer instead of a smart-ass hippie folk singer, his voice never quite meshes with Elizabeth Cook on “Feels So Right.” Wade Bowen and Brandy Clark’s duet on “Love in the First Degree” is excellent, however, and raises the anticipation level for Clark’s debut album.

Not every experiment is a success. Once again, “I’m in a Hurry” gets short shrift, as Jessica Lea Mayfield turns it into a funereal dirge. “Lady Down on Love” just does not work as a bluegrass/spoken word ballad, as evidenced by Bob Schneider & The Texas Bluegrass Massacre with Ray Benson. Jason Boland & The Stragglers’ take on “Mountain Music” is fine, but the insistence of aping the original, from the spoken-word intro to the guest vocals from a couple of the Stragglers à la Cook and Gentry is a little cheesy.

It’s a testament to Alabama’s far-reaching appeal that artists as different as Jason Isbell and Jason Aldean would want to sing their songs. Whether it’s a note-for-note recreation or a completely new interpretation of their hit songs, there is something in these two albums to please any Alabama fan.

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8 Comments

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8 Responses to A Tale of Two Tributes: Alabama

  1. Haven’t been able to find the 2nd one anywhere, but I loved the first one.

    One of the highlights for me was the FGL track. Chesney’s and Yearwood’s were my other 2 favorites.

  2. bobNo Gravatar

    I’ve always liked Alabama (saw them in concert at Westbury in the late 80′s), but these tribute albums for me leave a lot to be desired. I’m not a fan of most of the artists contributing to these two projects. In this regard, the Common Thread Eagles tribute was much more to my liking. I bought Trisha Yearwood’s “Forever’s As Far As I’ll Go” from the Alabama & Friends cd a few weeks ago. I just listened to the i-Tunes preview of High Cotton. The only song I’ll likely buy is the Brandy Clark – Wade Bowen duet.

  3. I thought the second tribute looked good on paper, but it didn’t end up working for me in the end. I guess it was just all too reimagined for my taste. I did like some of the tracks from the first album, particularly Yearwood’s, Johnson’s and Chesney’s tracks. I liked Toby Keith’s track pretty well too, but it was a little on the stale side.

  4. AndrewNo Gravatar

    The Bowen/Clark one is the only one I bought off the second album. Nothing else there really grabbed me. I got a few off the first, but I think a lot of that is just the comfort zone of having the songs more like the originals with voices I’m used to hearing a lot.

    Trisha’s track is far and away the best on either one.

  5. I haven’t had a chance to hear either album yet, but was underwhelmed by the production on the TY track. It’s the perfect song for her and she gives her usual beautiful vocal, but I thought the track was too AC overall and far too generic for someone with her talent. She deserved better.

    I’m a sucker for tribute albums, so I’ll probably pick up both at some point.

  6. Jonathan,
    I actually don’t disagree with you about the Trisha track. I was underwhelmed by the production too, but her vocal saved it for me in a big way.

  7. RussNo Gravatar

    I love the Isbell/White track. Between that and their appearance on Letterman, it makes one really want them to do more stuff together.

    Most of the time with tribute albums, I like the songs from the artists I like and that is the case with High Cotton (Isbell/White, Shires, Bowen/Clark, Old Crow).

  8. I actually really like the OCMS track, but always associate it with their recent EP, so I forget that it’s a part of the tribute album too.

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