Hall Worthy: 2014 Edition

halloffamelogoEight years ago, we posted our second edition of Hall Worthy, a list of significant country music figures who we felt were most deserving of being in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Since then, a lot has changed.  First and foremost, more than half of the list is now in the Hall of Fame (or, at least, headed there later this year.)  An additional entry, Wanda Jackson, is now in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

A bigger change came in 2009, when new categories were introduced to ensure that two artist inductees would be represented from different eras:  The Modern Era (20-44 years of national prominence), and the Veterans Era (45+ years of national prominence.)  There are also three more categories that rotate, meaning one from each category gets in every third year:  Non-Performer, Songwriter, and Recording and/or Touring Musician.

Finally, since that list was published, our readership has grown tremendously and is incredibly well-versed on country music, past and present.  So in this new and now annual edition of Hall Worthy, we are going to run down the list of the most successful artists that are eligible but have yet to make it into the Hall of Fame, in the order of  “Hall Worthiness.”

The Modern Era:

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Alan Jackson

Scoring his first hit in 1990 with “Here in the Real World”, Alan Jackson is the most successful country artist that isn’t currently in the Hall of Fame.  His storied career has included 25 #1 hits and 49 visits to the top ten.  He’s won a slew of awards over the years, including many for his songwriting.  He is the most traditionalist of all of the nineties superstars, but has managed to stay relevant regardless of how pop the genre went over the past quarter century, selling more than forty million albums in the U.S. alone.   He should be the next inductee for the Modern Era.

Randy Travis

Randy Travis

The poster child for the new traditionalist movement was also the first true country music superstar to sell millions of records without any crossover airplay or rock press appeal.  Travis is the primary reason that Nashville turned away from pursuing pop airplay for more than a decade, realizing that there was more than enough money to be made by growing (and eventually saturating) the country market.  His debut album, Storms of Life, remains one of the greatest country albums of all-time, and songs like “Forever and Ever, Amen”, “On the Other Hand”, and “Three Wooden Crosses” were award-winning classics.

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The Judds

Put aside all of the tabloid drama and focus just on the music.  Those heavenly harmonies were reminiscent of the Carter Family, while Wynonna’s breathtaking vocals added a contemporary breadth and soulful twist to their pure country sound.  They were so commercially successful and critically acclaimed that the CMA had to change the rules of the Vocal Duo category so someone else could win Vocal Group.   Wynonna’s solo career following Naomi Judd’s retirement only further extended the legacy of this essential duo.

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Ricky Skaggs

He’s often overlooked these days, as he’s made bluegrass his primary home.  But when he was a contemporary country star, he found a way to make bluegrass be contemporary country.  He was a central figure in making bluegrass music mainstream, making possible the future success of everyone from Alison Krauss & Union Station to the Dixie Chicks.   He’s managed to be both a pioneer of bluegrass music while also being a steadfast advocate for the bluegrass of old, and still scored eleven #1 country hits along the way and the CMA for Entertainer of the Year.  The Hall shouldn’t wait until he’s old enough for the Veterans Era.

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Patty Loveless

One of the few artists to successfully navigate both the eighties and the nineties on country radio, Patty Loveless is the most significant female artist of the Modern Era who is not yet inducted into the Hall of Fame.  Her acclaimed work for both MCA and Epic saw her develop from a singles artist with the good taste to cover Lucinda Williams, into an album artist that made critically acclaimed and surprisingly progressive traditional music.  Since fading from radio, she’s remained relevant with widely appreciated sets that delve deep into her mountain heritage, with her most recent set earning her a Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album.

Dwight Yoakam

Dwight Yoakam

Extraordinarily talented and unfailingly artistic, Dwight Yoakam remains one of the most significant country artists from the new traditionalist movement, though his traditionalism has always had a West Coast flair that was more Owens than Haggard.   Never that much of a radio favorite, Yoakam still managed to sell millions of records, being one of the few legitimate album artists of his time.   His most recent work, 3 Pears, made more year-end critics lists than any other country album in 2012.

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Trisha Yearwood

The only artist on this list who could never be described as a traditionalist, Trisha Yearwood has earned her place in the Hall of Fame through making more consistently excellent music over a longer period of time than any of her contemporaries.   She’s sold a ton of records and had more than her fair share of radio hits and industry awards, but her ultimate legacy will be having the best set of pipes and the best taste in songs, a combination that many artists – female and male – have never managed to pull off nearly as well as Yearwood has over the years.  That’s what having the voice of a Ronstadt and the song sense of a Harris will do for you.

The Veterans Era:

Hank Williams Jr

Hank Williams, Jr.

By a wide margin, Hank Jr. is the most commercially successful artist of the Veterans Era who is not yet in the Hall of Fame.  His noxious public statements in recent years have reinforced a notion that he’s little more than a Southern rock caricature, but his legacy is greater than Monday Night Football and regional xenophobia. At his peak, he made some of the most significant country rock that’s ever been made, crafting himself a distinguished place in country music history that is wholly separate from his legendary father.  In fact, there’s a better chance right now that a bar in America is singing along with “Family Tradition” than anything from his daddy’s catalog.

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Charlie Rich

An artist who was always years ahead of his time, he had a remarkable run of commercial success in the seventies, a period where the times finally caught up to him for a brief spell.  His bluesy style was embraced by the pop scene for a time, with his hit “The Most Beautiful Girl” being one of those rare country hits that also topped the Hot 100.   A veteran of the Sun Records label that produced Hall of Famers like Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley, Rich made the transition to Nashville while always keeping one foot grounded back in Memphis.

Jerry Reed

Jerry Reed

He was one of the most iconic stars of his time, thanks to his witty novelty records, stunning guitar prowess, and extensive appearances on film.  His songwriting success arrived earlier than his recording stardom, but once he got rolling, he was scoring million-selling hits that ran up the country and the pop charts.  He’s one of the few legends left that were truly unique and distinctive personalities who haven’t yet been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

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Tanya Tucker

She’s still three years away from eligibility in this category, with 2017 being the first year she can claim 45 years on the scene.  But while the competition is fierce for those Modern Era slots, Tucker should be voted in the first year she’s eligible as a veteran.  Her haunting, gothic early records are still revelatory, and in the years that followed, her gravely voice brought grit and soul to a long string of country hits.  She was able to remain a force to be reckoned with in the first half of the nineties, a remarkable holdover from the early seventies in an era that had wiped away even the stars of the late eighties to make room for the next big things.

Jim Ed Brown

Jim Ed Brown

Another legend that remained relevant over many different eras of country music, Jim Ed Brown’s immortality on record had already been guaranteed in 1959, when his family group the Browns recorded “The Three Bells.”  That classic hit topped the country and pop charts for many weeks, and the Browns kept going through most of the sixties, joining the cast of the Grand Ole Opry a few years before disbanding.  Brown went on to a successful solo career with classics like “Pop a Top” and “Morning” reaching the top five.  Then he teamed with Helen Cornelius and had his biggest hits since his days with the Browns, most notably “I Don’t Want to Have to Marry You.”  At age eighty, he remains a force on the Opry and as a radio host, making him one of the longest-running personalities that the genre has ever seen.

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12 Comments

Filed under Country Music Hall of Fame, Miscellaneous Musings

12 Responses to Hall Worthy: 2014 Edition

  1. Great read, Kevin, with a great rationale for each selection. Especially enjoyed the remarks on Trisha. I was little surprised by the lack of Oak Ridge Boys, but still a remarkably thorough list.

  2. Hoggy from OzNo Gravatar

    A wonderful list Kevin. Every artist worthy of a spot in the Hall of Fame. In particular, I really would love to see Alan Jackson, Dwight Yoakam and Patty Loveless inducted. I grew up loving their songs before I even realised I loved country music.

  3. bobNo Gravatar

    My favorite on your list by far is Trisha Yearwood, who you said is “the only artist on this list who could never be described as a traditionalist”. I never thought she was, but I’ve never seen it said on any country music blog or website.

    While I like Patty L, I’d much rather listen to Suzy B, Kathy M or MCC. (I don’t know if they’re considered to be traditional or not.) As far as the men on the list, I like Randy and a few AJ songs but prefer to listen to John Denver, Hal Ketchum and Collin Raye. I’m not disputing the merits of your proposed selections.

  4. ErikNo Gravatar

    I could side with Trisha being in there in whatever classification they’d choose. I also think, however, that both she and Emmylou would want Linda Ronstadt to get honored in some way as well.

  5. RobNo Gravatar

    This was exceptionally well written, and represents valid reasoning for each of the artists mentioned. While I can’t disagree with one word that Kevin wrote in this passage, I must take a few points off of the article for making me feel incredibly old.

  6. Uninterested ObserverNo Gravatar

    Eddie Rabbitt. And if they can’t figure out whether he’s a veteran or modern act, they can just add him as a songwriter: “I Love a Rainy Night”, “Drivin’ My Life Away”, “Suspicions”, “Pure Love”, “Kentucky Rain”. And so on.

  7. Uninterested ObserverNo Gravatar

    Oh. Crystal Gayle too.

  8. Kevin, as usual you’ve written an incredible piece.

    I’ll second Uninterested Observer’s mention of Crystal Gayle and Ben’s mention of Oak Ridge Boys. What about Toby Keith? Brooks & Dunn? Rodney Crowell?

  9. Paul W DennisNo Gravatar

    I don’t think the Judds are Hall worthy but 1’d agree with the rest of your choices and would add Crystal Gayle, Eddie Rabbitt, Dallas Frazier, Bradley Kincaid, Jimmy Martin, Wynn Stewart, The Oak Ridge Boys and The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

  10. Motown MikeNo Gravatar

    Is Keith Whitley eligible for the Hall of Fame? I remember when Garth Brooks was nominated, he stated that Whitley was one of the performers that should be in ahead of him and I agree with that. Whitley was a star, with many hits in his shortened career. Had he lived longer, I don’t doubt that he would have been a star of the 90’s and 2000’s along with Garth and more so George Strait and Alan Jackson.

  11. Jonathan KeefeNo Gravatar

    As concise and to-the-letter perfect a description of what makes Yearwood one of the all-time greats as I’ve read anywhere. Nicely done, Kevin!

    I agree with the previous commenters that Crystal Gayle deserves a place in the Hall Of Fame, as well, and I’d second Motown Mike’s nod for Keith Whitley. Paul’s list of Veterans Era acts looks pretty inclusive, though I can’t imagine not letting The Judds in.

  12. ScottNo Gravatar

    I agree with all these except Dwight Yoakam. His hit making career just wasnt that long, and I was never a fan anyway, with the exception of “I Sang Dixie”