Single Reviews: Miranda Lambert, “It All Comes Out in the Wash” and “Locomotive”

“It All Comes Out in the Wash”

Miranda Lambert

Written by Miranda Lambert, Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna, and Liz Rose

Miranda Lambert returns to her vintage sound with a pair of singles that preview her seventh solo album, due later this year.

The first, “It All Comes Out in the Wash,” seems tailor made for radio, where it already is making a big impact.  It has the “bubbly personality delivering a small town gossip lyric” vibe that has worked well for her in the past.

But much like other earlier singles like “Dead Flowers” and “Baggage Claim,” “Wash” stretches out a metaphor that doesn’t have much elastic built into it, running it into the ground before the second verse comes along.  It’s a disappointment that feels like a big step backwards for her.

Grade: C

“Locomotive”

Miranda Lambert

Written by Miranda Lambert, Ashley Monroe, and K.S. Rhoades

“Locomotive” fares better because it’s all about the groove.  Comparing yourself to a runaway train is hardly a groundbreaking concept for a country song, but the best examples of this well-worn theme have utilized the backing track to recreate the rhythm and rumble of a train on the tracks.

“Locomotive” does this wonderfully, and Lambert’s older, deeper vocal is a perfect fit for the pulsating beat that she’s singing over.  Again, it doesn’t stake out any new territory for her as an artist, but it’s the more satisfying of this pair of retreads.

Grade: B

 

3 Comments

  1. I find the production on “It All Comes Out In The Wash” to just be super busy, and it’s not executed well in the slightest. I mean, the line about getting frisky with your boss implies (and subsequently laughs off) something that really shouldn’t have made its way into a song in 2019 … or ever.

    On the other hand, it’s got a decent groove to it, and it’s certainly the most exuberant she’s sounded in years, so good for her. But yeah, I’ll take “Locomotive” over IACOITW.

  2. Well, its ‘big impact’ at radio is the result of a clear deal with radio. Let’s see how it does on its own merit.

  3. First off, I actually liked “Dead Flowers”…but I digress. I completely agree with you on “Baggage Claim” and “It All Comes Out in the Wash”. “Wash” is arguably the first single Miranda’s done where I’d say…this is kind of unlistenable. As mentioned, the production is heavy, and I never really got into the “ooh ooh oohs” that have been put in a lot of country songs. I find it as a frill in a song that’s more annoying than enhancing, and for me, it takes away from the overall message of the lyrics. This might have worked better in a stripped down version, but even there…while I respect what Miranda is trying to do, I think she’s almost letting her personal experiences override the quality of her music. I typically respect that she writes about herself and her experiences, and believe her openness is what makes her one of the few mainstream country artists worth listening to. But, while it worked on “Platinum” and “Weight of These Wings” beautifully…here it just feels like it’s shoehorned into the song, and the lyric is just not as good as most of the work on those previous albums. The lyrics just feel a bit lazy to me, even though I do understand the message. It just falls far short of the standard she’s set.

    “Locomotive” is better, but as you said…it’s kind of a retread on previous work. I’ll be interested in how her next album turns out. She made some really, really good work with Producer Frank Liddell, and I’m intrigued to see if Joyce is similarly able to capture the “quiet, introspective” Miranda. She’s too good not to have some more interesting material on that album.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.