Author Archives: Kevin John Coyne

Single Review: Sam Hunt, “Leave the Night On”

Sam Hunt Leave the Night On

“Leave the Night On”
Sam Hunt

Written by Sam Hunt, Shane McAnally, and Josh Osborne

I feel like I’ve heard this song so many times before that the artist has to work extra hard just to even keep my attention.

Sam Hunt works pretty hard to do that.  Not as a vocalist, mind you.  But as a songwriter, which is what’s put him on the map in the first place.

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100 Greatest Men: #24. The Statler Brothers

The Statler Brothers100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

In 2008, the Statler Brothers were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.   Five members of the quartet were inducted, a tribute to their status as one of the few groups in recorded music to achieve legendary success both before and after a high-profile lineup change.

The Statler Brothers got their name from a tissue box, though two of them – Harold and Don Reid – were actually brothers.  First performing as the Kingsmen, hey started as a church singing group in Staunton, Virginia. Harold initially performed as part of a trio with Phil Balsley and Lew DeWitt, and Don joined later on, making them a quartet.   They opened a local show for Johnny Cash, who was so impressed that he invited them to join his traveling show and helped them score a contract with Columbia Records.

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100 Greatest Men: #25. Tom T. Hall

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Tom T HallTom T. Hall is known as the Storyteller, a fitting title for a man whose ability to spin a musical yarn led to some of the greatest country story songs of all-time, many of which he sang himself.

His childhood set the stage for a career in music.  His father gave him a guitar when he was eight, and he learned music from his hometown neighbor Clayton Delaney, later the subject of Hall’s longest-running #1 single.  His mother died when he was just 11, and when a hunting accident four years later made it impossible for his father to work, Hall joined the workforce of a garment factory at age 15.

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Single Review: Blake Shelton featuring Gwen Sebastian, “My Eyes”

Blake Shelton My Eyes

“My Eyes”

Blake Shelton featuring Gwen Sebastian

Written by Andrew Dorff, Tommy Lee James, and Josh Osborne

Is a play on words really that romantic?  I can imagine being asked, “If I said you had a beautiful body, would you hold it against me?” getting an icebreaking laugh, for sure.

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Single Review: Hunter Hayes, “Tattoo”

Hunter Hayes TattooI want to preface this by saying, as I’ve said before, that Hunter Hayes is tremendously talented.

“Tattoo” is further evidence that he can assemble all of the necessary components for an entertaining record, and I guess it is a pretty entertaining record.

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Single Review: Kenny Chesney, “American Kids”

Kenny Chesney American KidsIf you’re going to keep revisiting the same themes, you might as well take some risks with your delivery.

Kenny Chesney’s new single sounds fresher and more engaging than anything he’s done in a very long time.  It’s easy to miss that he’s singing about what he always sings about: nostalgia for growing up in the country with American rock as the soundtrack.

 

What makes “American Kids” work more than a lot his attempts with this theme is that sounds like he learned something listening to those Mellencamp and Springsteen records.  This record oozes charm and mature authority, like he’s finally lived long enough to look back and say, “Hey. We were kinda crazy back then.  But we all turned out alright in the end.”

Written by Rodney Clawson, Luke Laird, and Shane McAnally

Grade: B+

 

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Single Review: Kacey Musgraves, “The Trailer Song”

Kacey Musgraves the Trailer SongA new Kacey Musgraves track with co-writes from Brandy Clark and Shane McAnally is not a bad way to start your day.

“The Trailer Song” has been a live staple for Musgraves, and it sounds like a lost cut from her Grammy-winning album.  It’s a humorous song, but it’s neither satire nor novelty. Continue reading

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Album Review: Dolly Parton, Blue Smoke

Dolly Parton Blue Smoke

Dolly Parton
Blue Smoke
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A big step up from her last few projects, Dolly Parton’s Blue Smoke is her most balanced album since Backwoods Barbie.   While it lacks cohesion due to so many different styles being used, there’s a solid entry from every kind of Dolly – country Dolly, pop Dolly, mountain Dolly, gospel Dolly, duet-with-fellow-legend Dolly.   While it isn’t likely to be anyone’s favorite Dolly Parton album because of this, it’s also unlikely that any fan of hers won’t find something here that reminds them of why they became a fan in the first place.

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Album Review: Miranda Lambert, Platinum

Miranda Lambert Platinum

Miranda Lambert
Platinum

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Miranda Lambert’s life experience has caught up with her talent.

Platinum is a confident, intelligent record that weaves the themes of nostalgia, femininity, and celebrity together over sixteen tracks.  It’s a cohesive set, with lead single “Automatic” making much more sense in the context of the full album.  It’s also remarkably, defiantly country, which shows more of a rock-and-roll attitude these days than rocking out does.

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100 Greatest Men: #26. Roy Acuff

Roy Acuff100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Roy Acuff is responsible for not only some of the genre’s foundational recordings, but for helping to put Nashville on the map as a star of the Grand Ole Opry, a music publishing tycoon, and even a candidate for governor of Tennessee.

Not bad for a middle child from rural Tennessee, the son of a prominent family from the small town of Maynardville.  Though both of his parents were skilled musicians, his passion was baseball, and he got as far as minor league tryouts before sunstroke ended his budding career.   He chose to hone his skills with the fiddle, and began performing around the south as part of a touring medicine show.  Incorporating the southern gospel song, “Great Speckled Bird”, into his performances caught the attention of the record companies.   By the end of the thirties, he had several hits and a Grand Ole Opry cast membership to his credit.

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