Aaron Tippin

Recommend Ten Tracks: 2009 Edition

December 12, 2009 // 17 Comments

2009Can’t say that I’m loving country music in its 2009 version, though my steadfast allegiance to the genre runs deep, so I hold out hope as a new decade is about to begin. Tonight, I’m recommending ten tracks from albums that were released this year. I’ve avoided singles so there’s some sense of discovery. I look forward to discovering music that I missed through the comments!

Recommend Ten Tracks: 2009 Edition

Lorrie Morgan, “I’m Always On a Mountain When I Fall” from A Moment in Time

I love the effect that was created by having this album recorded live in the studio. It’s like hearing her in a smoky nightclub. This is by far my favorite track on the album, a loser’s lament that was quite worthy of revival.

Aaron Tippin, “Prisoner of the Highway” from In Overdrive

He already has the default voice of the overworked working man, so his world-weary vocal is a perfect fit for this song about an imprisoned by the freedom of the road.

Country Music Firsts

August 24, 2009 // 40 Comments

pamtillisOur readers have clearly responded well to our Back to the Nineties features this month. (Fret not, there are more on the way.) Part of the reason is that so many of you, like myself and Leeann, first discovered country music in that decade.

This isn’t too surprising, as the nineties helped establish country music as a genre with widespread appeal. The suburbanization of once-rural America reached its apex, and at the same time, CMT deeply penetrated the cable market. For you newbies, the channel was 24-hour videos back then, with remarkably democratic video rotation.

A clip in heavy rotation would only be seen two more times a day than one in light rotation. This is the reason both Mutt Lange and Sean Penn discovered Shania Twain through her “What Made You Say That” clip, which was played extensively on the channel despite the song stalling at #55 at radio.

The New York country radio station back then would do a “Country Convert” feature every morning. A radio listener would call in and say what song converted them to country music. Newbies to country music back then had a religious zeal to them, and would work very hard trying to convince others to fall in love with the music.

Aaron Tippin Starter Kit

March 21, 2009 // 11 Comments

Starter Kits are Country Universe’s way of introducing country music fans to an artist that they might not be fully aware of. This Starter Kit features Aaron Tippin, who will soon enter his third decade as a country recording artist.

Tippin was a hit from the beginning, launching his career with a gold-selling debut album. Over the course of the nineties and early 2000s, he would reach that sales level multiple times, racking up several top ten hits along the way. He recently released In Overdrive, a solid collection of truck driving anthems.

The Starter Kit includes one track from this recent release, along with nine others from throughout Tippin’s career that are required listening. As always, let me know what was missed in the comments.

“You’ve Got to Stand For Something” from the 1991 album You’ve Got to Stand For Something

Tippin established his artistic identity immediately with his debut single. Pride in family, pride in country, and pride in your beliefs are themes that Tippin would revisit frequently over the years, making much of his best music in the process.

“There Ain’t Nothin’ Wrong With the Radio” from the 1992 album Read Between the Lines

Tippin scored a huge hit with this ode to his car radio, the only part of his vehicle that isn’t falling apart.

“I Wouldn’t Have it Any Other Way” from the 1992 album Read Between the Lines

One of his many hits to champion the underdog, the accompanying video clip has him playing a factory worker who rallies for better working conditions.

Aaron Tippin, In Overdrive

March 10, 2009 // 12 Comments

Aaron Tippin In Overdrive Amongst the glut of faux traditionalists that populated the country airwaves during the nineties, there was one voice that cut right through the clutter, such was its raw verve and unabashed authenticity. Aaron Tippin sings with pure country conviction about the invisible Americans, giving voice to the working men and women who seem to have vanished from the collective national consciousness. In truth, Tippin was their last great champion, scoring radio hits with such anthems as “I Got it Honest”, “I Wouldn’t Have it Any Other Way” and “Working Man’s Ph.D.” So it seems fitting that he has returned with a concept album that celebrates the American trucker, collecting most of the high-profile road songs in country music history, but also including some low-profile gems that give In Overdrive greater depth and resonance. One of the reasons the album works so well is that Tippin sounds Read More

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