Tag Archives: Bruce Robison

iPod Check: Hidden Treasures

This edition of iPod Check is all about those great songs that you love which aren’t that well known.  Put your iPod or favorite playlist on shuffle, then list the first ten songs that come up which weren’t singles or widely heard album cuts.

Bonus  points for a little blurb with each song!

My list is after the jump.

1. Shania Twain, “Whatever You Do! Don’t!”

Only four of the sixteen tracks from Come On Over weren’t released as singles for one market or another.  It features the creative use of fiddles that would become so prominent on Up!

2. Todd Snider, “Maybe You Heard”

From the Kris Kristofferson tribute album The Pilgrim, it’s a powerful challenge to friends who aren’t friends in need: “Don’t you condemn him. Leave it to strangers.  You oughta know to give him a hand if you can.”

3.  Bonnie Tyler, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”

Creedence Clearwater Revival as arranged by Jim Steinman?  As the opener of the album that features “Total Eclipse of the Heart”, it’s surprisingly effective.

4. Willie Nelson, “Rainbow Connection”

A lot of his covers don’t work – “Time After Time”, anyone?  But this one does, taking a Kermit the Frog standard and elevating it to the league of “Imagine.”

5. Bruce Robison, “Can’t Get There From Here”

Why Tim McGraw or Keith Urban haven’t covered this yet is beyond me: “I’m on a road that’s going nowhere, looking for a place that I belong. The wind’s pushing me in all directions, and none of them look like home.”

6.  Tim McGraw, “Tickin’ Away”

Time is running out, and not just because closing time is drawing near.

7. Johnny Cash, “I See a Darkness”

This time the friend in need is there, but that’s not enough to halt his desperation from spiraling out of control.

8. Lorrie Morgan, “Greater Need”

“It seems like I want you around me a little more than you want to be, so I guess I’m the one with a greater need.”  Killer.

9. Joe Diffie, “Good Brown Gravy”

They didn’t call him Joe Ditty for nothing.  But this one’s a riot!

10. Madonna, “‘Til Death Do Us Part”

From her post-divorce classic Like a Prayer, this is one of the most nakedly revealing songs I’ve heard.  “The bruises they will fade away. You hit so hard with the things you say. I will not stay to watch your hate as it grows. You’re not in love with someone else. You don’t even love yourself. Still, I wish you’d ask me not to go.

What are your ten hidden treasures?

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The 201 Greatest Singles of the Decade, Conclusion: #20-#1

#20
“Not Ready to Make Nice”
Dixie Chicks
2006
Peak: #36

It’s easy to label this as a transitory response of a song, whose quality is stamped by context and time, but to do so is to undermine its carefully crafted layers of universal emotion. Anger is only the outer coating of the song – beneath it lies a tender-to-the-touch complex of feelings:  pain and disgust, confusion and resolve, stubbornness and defeat. “Not Ready to Make Nice” may always recall a certain unfortunate episode in country music history, but its theme – that sometimes there’s a price to pay for standing up for what you believe – is timeless. – Tara Seetharam

#19
“Probably Wouldn’t Be this Way”
LeAnn Rimes
2005
Peak: #3

A striking portrait of grief that alternates between phases of desolation, disillusionment and gratitude. Rimes’ interpretation of the lyrics is chillingly precise. – TS Continue reading

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The 201 Greatest Singles of the Decade, Part 8: #60-#41

The 201 Greatest Singles of the Decade, Part 8: #60-#41

#60
“Long Trip Alone”
Dierks Bentley
2006
Peak: #10

In a perfect world, this would be this decade’s wedding standard. – Kevin Coyne

#59
“Your Man”
Josh Turner
2005
Peak: #1

Lush baritone against an effortlessly charismatic, enticing invitation to let Turner be “your man.” How can you resist? – Tara Seetharam Continue reading

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The 100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 5: #60-#51

    The 100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 5

    bruce robison country sunshine

    #60
    Bruce Robison, Country Sunshine

    One of modern country’s little-known heroes, Robison has built a career on simple songs of unusually strong focus, voice and insight. His strongest collection from this decade mainly explores love at its point of disenchantment, with characters sitting at various fallouts pondering who’s to blame, who used who, or why the feelings aren’t requited. Not so much Sunshine, then, but quite a bit of Country. – Dan Milliken

    Recommended Tracks: “Friendless Marriage”, “What Would Willie Do”, “Tonight”

    59 Rascal

    #59
    Rascal Flatts, Feels Like Today

    The group has yet to hit the nail on the “Rascal Flatts” head again like they did with this country-pop album – a collection of powerful, melody-driven songs on which Gary LeVox manages to tastefully reign in his tenor. When paired with the right material –particularly deep-rooted love songs like “Bless The Broken Road” –, the Flatts boys can emote like it’s nobody’s business, resulting in soaring, passionate performances. – Tara Seetharam

    Recommended Tracks: “Where You Are”, “Bless The Broken Road”, “Oklahoma-Texas Line”

    58 Keith

    #58
    Keith Urban, Love, Pain & the whole crazy thing

    Urban’s creativity peaked with this ambitious set, with arrangements as revelatory as his lyrics. As an album, it’s a cohesive work of art, yet it still managed to produce his strongest collection of singles that work just as well outside of their home. – Kevin Coyne

    Recommended Tracks: “I Told You So”, “Stupid Boy”, “Got it Right This Time”

    57 Willie

    #57
    Willie Nelson and Asleep at the Wheel, Willie and The Wheel

    Willie Nelson teamed up with Western swing giants Asleep at the Wheal to create a project filled with warm treatments of Western swing standards. While Nelson sounds very much alive on this album, his trademark phrasing perfectly captures a relaxed, yet proficient, vibe. In order to be as prolific as Nelson tends to be, it’s common for him to minimally prepare for his recordings. It’s been reported that this was not the case for this album, however. Instead, he studied and practiced these songs until he felt comfortable enough to really do them justice. His extra effort is clearly evident as a result. – Leeann Ward

    Recommended Tracks: “Hesitation Blues”, “I Ain’t Gonna Give Nobody None…”, “Right or Wrong”

    56 Brad

    #56
    Brad Paisley, American Saturday Night

    I’m drawn to albums that can flawlessly blend contemporary and traditional country music, and Paisley’s eighth album is a remarkable example in all senses. It’s a surprisingly revealing, carefully-written album that’s engaging yet lighthearted, and it embraces social consciousness as effectively as it does Paisley-seasoned humor. He’s not the first to do so, but Paisley certainly furthers the case that you can successfully look both forwards and backwards on the same album. – TS

    Recommended Tracks: “Welcome To The Future”, “Everybody’s Here”, “You Do The Math”

    ryan heartbreaker

    #55
    Ryan Adams, Heartbreaker

    Adams had already released some exemplary work with Whiskeytown by the time the Aughts rolled around, but it was his classic solo debut that cemented him as alt-country’s “It” Boy. With the aural looseness of folk and the shrewd scrutiny of classic country, Heartbreaker plays like the very encapsulation of despair, each track exposing a cathartic new layer of its creator’s weary, self-mocking psyche. It would all be insufferably bleak if it didn’t sound so strangely healing. – DM

    Recommended Tracks: “AMY”, “Oh My Sweet Carolina”, “Come Pick Me Up”

    54 Bruce

    #54
    Bruce Springsteen, We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions

    Recorded in Springsteen’s living room, The Seeger Sessions is a project that celebrates the songs of activist and folk singer, Pete Seeger. For this unique recording, Springsteen temporarily breaks away from his rock E Street Band and forms the more organic, big band style Sessions Band, which includes horns, banjo, guitar, percussion, piano, B3 organ, Harmonica, violin and upright bass. The result is a delightful album that sounds like a well executed jam session rather than a stuffy studio affair. – LW

    Recommended Tracks: “Old Dan Tucker”, “O Mary Don’t You Weep for Me”, “Pay Me My Money Down”

    53 Lady

    #53
    Lady Antebellum, Lady Antebellum

    There isn’t anyone in country music quite like this vibrant trio, whose debut is a heartfelt, organic mainstream country album with undertones of 70’s-esque R&B. There’s a beautiful imperfection to the pairing of Charles Kelley and Hillary Scott’s equally soulful voices, and they’ve got a particular knack for writing melodies that are as interesting as they are expressive. Lady Antebellum is both a skillful showcase of these strengths and an exciting glimpse at the group’s potential in country music. – TS

    Recommended Tracks: “All We’d Ever Need”, “Love’s Lookin’ Good On You”, “I Run To You”

    52 Alan

    #52
    Alan Jackson, Like Red On a Rose

    Who would think that the combination of bluegrass legend Alison Krauss and traditional country legend Alan Jackson would result in an album like this? With Krauss as producer, Jackson became the consummate crooner, singing with such depth and nuance that it was like hearing a completely different singer. – KC

    Recommended Tracks: “Like Red On a Rose”, “Nobody Said That it Would Be Easy”, “The Firefly’s Song”

    51 Brad

    #51
    Brad Paisley, Time Well Wasted

    Brad Paisley’s fourth album continues the more aggressively muscular sound that its predecessor, Mud on the Tires had already wisely adopted. As is typical for a Paisley album his sharp wit shows up throughout the disc in the form of sly observations to which people can easily relate. However, he strays from the humor at times in order to deliver some of the most beloved songs of his career, including “Waitin’ on A Woman” and “When I Get Where I’m Going.” – LW

    Recommended Tracks: “Rainin’ You”, “Easy Money”, “Time Well Wasted”

    - – -

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    100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 2: #90-#81

      The 100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 2

      90 Miranda

      #90
      Miranda Lambert, Kerosene

      On her first major-label album, Lambert reveals herself as a fiery, spirited artist with a lot to say, and a clever voice with which to speak. Her sharp songwriting skills, though a work in progress as we’d later learn, take her naturally from aggression to desolation and back again. But most notably, through Kerosene, Lambert got the traditionalists to pay a little more attention to mainstream country music and its more promising artists. – Tara Seetharam

      Recommended Tracks: “Kerosene”, “I Can’t Be Bothered”

      89 Kris

      #89
      Kris Kristofferson, This Old Road
      This Old Road has not have received as much mainstream attention as Kristofferson’s recent appearance in Ethan Hawke’s Rolling Stone article; an unfortunate fact, given it was the legendary writer’s first album of new material in 11 years. With This Old Road, Kristofferson shines a spotlight on the world much in the same his earlier writing shined a spotlight on himself. The result is an overtly political album with more depth than most modern attempts have been able to produce. – William Ward

      Recommended Tracks: “The Last Thing to Go”, “Pilgrim’s Progress”

      88 Guy

      #88
      Guy Clark, Workbench Songs

      The recordings  of the songs that Guy Clark, one of country music’s most respected modern songwriters, has written for the most popular artists in country music are typically polished by the best Nashville musicians and slick producers. But Clark’s own albums tend to be more organic, with spare instrumentation that somehow manages to avoid sounding anemic as a result. His well worn voice sings these eleven melodically and lyrically strong songs with warmth and the kind of emotion that easily captures the listener. It’s one of the best albums of his deep catalog that spans over thirty years. – Leeann Ward

      Recommended Tracks: “Walkin’ Man”, “Expose”

      87 Wynonna

      #87
      Wynonna, What the World Needs Now is Love

      It’s hard to believe that it’s been six years since Wynonna’s last proper studio album. This collection is easily one of her best, with effective covers like “I Want to Know What Love Is” and “Flies On the Butter”, along with socially conscious material that provokes thought instead of pandering to already held beliefs (“It All Comes Down to Love”). – Kevin Coyne

      Recommended Tracks: “Sometimes I Feel Like Elvis”, “Rescue Me”

      86 Lee Ann

      #86
      Lee Ann Womack, I Hope You Dance

      The massively successful title track powered this album to triple platinum, but it also overshadowed the excellent songs surrounding it. For those who explored the album beyond track two, there were some of Womack’s finest moments on record, as she had the good taste to plunder the catalogs of Bruce Robison (“Lonely Too”), Bobbie Cryner (“Stronger Than I Am”), Julie Miller (“I Know Why the River Runs”), and Rodney Crowell (“Ashes By Now”). – KC

      Recommended Tracks: “Lonely Too”, “Does My Ring Burn Your Finger”

      85 Chris

      #85
      Chris Thile, How to Grow a Woman From the Ground

      This is the first album from the band that would eventually become Punch Brothers. Garnering a Grammy Award Nomination in 2006, How to Grow a Woman From the Ground is a solid bluegrass album with classical sensibilities and extraordinary instrumentation. – WW

      Recommended Tracks: “Wayside (Back in Time)”, “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground”

      84 Ralph

      #84
      Ralph Stanley II, This One Is Two

      Hyperbole alert, but it’s hard to think of a more beautiful-sounding traditional country album from this decade, or one which more comfortably merges old school aesthetics with modern production polish. Stanley corralled a number of meaty story songs here, but it’s the combination of his warm baritone and the lush instrumentation that gives this gem its quiet strength. – Dan Milliken

      Recommended Tracks: “Cold Shoulder”, “They Say I’ll Never Go Home”

      83 Louvin

      #83
      Various Artists, Livin’ Lovin’ Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers

      Tribute albums too often feel redundant, as well-meaning artists deliver nice but forgettable imitations of classic records. Not so with the Louvins’, which sticks veteran and current artists alike on the Bros’ close harmonies and sees each intriguing combination (Pam Tillis and Johnny Cash? Why not!) triumph. I daresay it’s as good an introduction to the duo’s work as any compilation of their own recordings. – DM

      Recommended Tracks: “How’s the World Treating You?”, “Are You Teasing Me”

      82 Todd

      #82
      Todd Snider, The Excitement Plan

      Snider mostly avoids both political themes and complex arrangements on his latest record, emphasizing his greatest strength as a writer instead: his uncanny ability to make the most specifically personal have universal resonance. Listen out for a wonderful cameo from Loretta Lynn on “Don’t Tempt Me.” – KC

      Recommended Tracks: “Barefoot Champagne”, “Money, Compliments, Publicity (Song Number 10)”

      81 O'Connor

      #81
      Mark O’Connor, Thirty-Year Retrospective (Live)

      Mark O’Connor’s Thirty Year Retrospective is a double instrumental album of his live performance with Chris Thile, Bryan Sutton and Byron House.  The album covers a wide range of Mark O’Connor’s career, presenting a range of instrumental country, bluegrass, new grass and jazz with the detail and care often only applied to classical music. – WW

      Recommended Tracks: “Caprice No. 4 in D Major”, “Macedonia”

      - – -

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      Discussion: Non-Hit Singles of the Decade

      BillboardPop on those thinking caps; we’ve encountered a dilemma that Wikipedia alone cannot remedy!

      See, like any warm-blooded entertainment blog, CU totally gets off on ranking stuff. So naturally, we’ve been hard at work piecing together our opinions on the decade’s finest albums and singles. The former category has proven easy enough to probe; the latter, however, presents a significant challenge, since singles that aren’t mainstream hits are often swept under the public carpet as the years go by.

      I think it would be a shame to overlook some of the Aughts’ best work just because of our limited recall and research abilities, though, and I know our readers are diverse and knowledgeable enough to help us fill in the gaps. So I’m inviting everyone to name a bunch of their lesser-known favorites to help us broaden our selection pool (and have a little fun while we’re at it).

      For example, my personal list would include:

      • Nickel Creek, “When You Come Back Down”
      • Dolly Parton, “Shine”
      • Alison Krauss & Union Station, “Restless”
      • Alison Krauss & James Taylor, “How’s The World Treating You”
      • Loretta Lynn with Jack White, “Portland, Oregon”
      • Old Crow Medicine Show, “Wagon Wheel”
      • Ryan Adams, “Let It Ride”
      • Pinmonkey, “That Train Don’t Run”
      • Randy Rogers Band, “Somebody Take Me Home”
      • Ashley Monroe, “Satisfied”
      • Bruce Robison, “All Over But the Cryin'”
      • Randy Travis, “Dig Two Graves”

      And those are just some of the easy ones. But I’ll let y’all take over: What are some of your favorite non-hit singles from the past decade? Feel free to include anything from any classification of country – mainstream, Alt-Country/Americana, bluegrass, Texas, independent – and definitely include as many as you like, especially if you have a few that haven’t been mentioned yet. If it didn’t go Top 20 and was shipped to radio, it’s fair game!

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      Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters: Darrell Scott

      darrell-scottI’m pleased to introduce a new feature to Country Universe readers, which is a spin off of Favorite Songs by Favorite Artists called Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters.

      While we all appreciate songwriters for their invaluable contributions to our favorite artists, they still often remain unrecognized as the people behind the scenes and, therefore, stand in the shadows of the big name artists who sing their songs. The purpose of this feature is to spotlight those songwriters who had or have aspirations of being stars, but are better known for sharing their craft with the more visible artists.

      Therefore, the criteria for this feature is that the spotlighted songwriter has to have both written songs that other artists have recorded and recorded music of his/her own. For instance, Darrell Scott, Rodney Crowell, Radney Foster, Kris Kristofferson, Bruce Robison, etc. are eligible songwriters, since they’ve recorded their own music and written songs for other artists. Conversely, people like Alan Jackson, Garth Brooks, Randy Travis, Clint Black etc. won’t be eligible, since they’ve mostly only written songs for themselves and not others.

      Finally, Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters will include a mix of songs that the songwriter has recorded, and songs that he/she has written that other artists have recorded, which will obviously depend on our favorite songs by that songwriter and our preferred version of the chosen song.

      With this feature, we hope to help readers realize the contributions of individual songwriters and, perhaps, inspire you to explore the artists’ own discographies as a result.

      Last summer I kicked off our Songwriters Series with my favorite modern country music songwriter, Darrell Scott. So, I thought it fitting to do the same with this new feature. Since I’ve already taken up considerable space describing this feature, I encourage you all to refer to my aforementioned spotlight to learn more about the man about which this article is written.

      A pertinent note, however, is that most of the songs on this list have been recorded by both Scott and other artists. While the majority of the songs on this particular list will specifically refer to other artists, please assume that Scott’s own recordings are more than worth exploring as well.

      #15

      Darrell Scott, “Banjo Clark”
      Aloha From Nashville

      One of the things that I marvel the most about Darrell Scott is his ability to write songs that sound like timeless standards. “Banjo Clark” is one such song. In fact, I had to double check to make sure Scott had actually written this song and that it wasn’t a public domain standard that he revived.

      #14

      Tim McGraw, “Old Town New”
      Live Like You Were Dying

      Scott wrote “Old Town New” with another superb modern songwriter, Bruce Robison. So, it’s no surprise that this song about a man wishing that he could make his old town feel new again after a failed relationship is good. While it remained just an album cut on McGraw’s signature album, it’s as good as many of the singles that were released from it.

      #13

      Suzy Bogguss, “No Way Out”
      Give Me Some Wheels

      “No Way Out” is up-tempo, but is not devoid of life’s realities. The family experiences familiar hardships, but the husband and wife hold themselves accountable by reminding each other that they’ve “fell in love and there’s no way out.”

      While Bogguss’ recording is the superior version, both Darrel Scott’s and Julie Roberts’ versions are good as well. Moreover, this is the first song of Scott’s that was recorded by another artist.

      #12

      Darrell Scott, “When There’s No One Around”

      Family Tree

      Garth Brooks recorded a version of “When There’s No One Around”, but Scott’s version is more organic and sonically appealing. It’s a poignant look at who we are when there’s no one around, which is inevitably different than our public personas.

      #11

      Travis Tritt, “It’s A Great Day to Be Alive”
      Down the Road I Go

      We  all know “It’s A Great Day to Be Alive”, since it was a big hit for Travis Tritt. This song has been recorded by Scott and Cory Morrow. Tritt’s is the definitive version, however. It tries to be hopeful while still somehow managing to feel a little bleak at the same time. While he proclaims that it’s a great day to be alive, there’s a sadness that lurks under the surface that seems to threaten the bright outlook, which is actually more tangible in Scott’s recording.

      #10

      Darrell Scott, “With A Memory Like Mine”

      Real Time

      “With A Memory Like Mine” was co-written with his dad, Wayne Scott. Darrell found the beginnings of this song in a notebook of his father’s and encouraged the Elder Scott to finish it with him. Scott’s version, which can be found on a solid project with Tim O’Brien, is darker than the quick paced recording by The John Cowan Band, which is more appropriate for this chillingly sad song. The man sends his son off to war by telling him to “be a good soldier/but return again someday.” His son does return, but in the most devastating way possible for a parent. In a casket.

      #9

      Martina McBride, “I’m Trying”

      Shine

      “I’m Trying” has been recorded by both Diamond Rio as a duet with Chely Wright and Martina McBride, though McBride’s is the stronger version. It explores a struggling relationship that almost seems like more work than it’s worth. Instead of leaving us with a typical happy or tragic ending, we are only given an assurance that they love each other and they are trying to make things work. The melody is tastefully simple with a fitting production that showcases McBride’s atypical restrained vocals, which translates into appropriate empathy for the characters within the song. It is a simple song with a simple production, but still poignant in a quiet way.

      #8

      Trace Adkins, “Someday”

      More

      Adkins is the only artist to record this song, as far as I know. It’s a beautiful and hopeful song, with tinges of sadness. As is duly noted about Adkins, he sings these more serious songs the best, even if radio disagrees.

      #7

      Dixie Chicks, “Heartbreak Town”

      Fly

      This is an indictment on Nashville, which is one of two songs written by Scott and recorded by The Chicks that tackles the topic. The song portrays Nashville, a place where so many people hope to enjoy success, as a “heartbreak town, which is something that both the Chicks and Scott have surely learned from personal experience.

      #6

      Kathy Mattea, “Loves Not Through With You Yet”

      Right Out of Nowhere

      I’m thrilled that one of my favorite Mattea albums includes this thoughtful, gorgeous Celtic flavored song by Darrell Scott: “You may think that love takes two, but loves a gift from you to you.”

      #5

      Sara Evans, “Born to Fly”

      Born to Fly

      Scott happened to write one of Sara Evans’ most recognizable and best hits to date. “Born to Fly” is an infectious coming of age song. While her parents are stable and grounded, that’s not the way the songs’ character wishes to live and she asks, “How do you keep your feet on the ground when you know you were born to fly?”

      #4

      Darryl Worley, “Family Tree”

      I Miss My Friend

      While many of Scott’s songs can be heavy, this is an example of his sillier side. Scott does a great version, but Worley cuts loose just the right amount. He clearly revels in singing deliciously smarmy lyrics like, “Well, raisin’ up babies is our new sport/You’re one day late and I’m one dollar short/Now, maybe it was planned or maybe it was a goof/But a cat’s got to dance on a hot tin roof.”

      #3

      Darrell Scott, “Goodle’ USA”

      The Invisible Man

      A more watered down version of this song can be heard on Faith Hill’s album. If one doesn’t listen closely, it’s easy to miss the probing lyrics that question the state of America. While Scott’s recording is not quite as polished, the political message is much more overt, which includes his original lyrics that were altered for Hill’s version to be less controversial.

      #2

      Dixie Chicks, “Long Time Gone”

      Home

      This is the other song that was written by Scott and recorded by The Chicks that takes Nashville to task. Wrapped in an unshakably catchy melody, “Long Time Gone” disregards conventional niceties and tersely critiques the music that’s being played on the radio:

      “Now me and Delia singin’ every Sunday
      Watchin’ the children and the garden grow
      We listen to the radio to hear what’s cookin’
      But the music ain’t got no soul

      Now they sound tired but they don’t sound Haggard
      They got money but they don’t have cash
      They got Junior but they don’t have Hank
      I think, I think, I think…the rest is…
      A long Time Gone”

      #1

      Patty Loveless, “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive”

      Mountain Soul

      Patty Loveless’ recording of “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive” sounds like a superb arrangement of a forgotten classic, except it isn’t a remake and was written just over ten years ago. While I feel the definitive version was recorded by Patty Loveless, Darrell Scott has recorded two versions that, even if Loveless’ version did not exist, would earn a spot on this list. Through haunting lyrics and melodic structure, “Harlan” tells the tragic story of the bleak existence of coalminers that is just about inevitable:

      “But the times got hard and tobacco wasn’t selling
      And old granddad knew what he’d do to survive
      He went and dug for Harlan coal
      And sent the money back to grandma
      But he never left Harlan alive

      Where the sun comes up about ten in the mornin’
      And the sun goes down about three in the day
      And you’ll fill your cup with whatever bitter brew you’re drinkin’
      And you spend your life just thinkin’ of how to get away”

      Patty Loveless sings this song with an immense emotional intensity that was likely gathered from personal experience as a daughter of a coalmining father who eventually succumbed to “Black Lung Disease” as a result of coalmining in Kentucky. In fact, each person who has sung this song so far, including Darrell Scott himself, has a personal and deep understanding of the significance of the hopelessness that the lyrics convey, since Brad Paisley, Kathy Mattea and Scott also lived in coalmining towns as children. Consequently, they were all exposed to the horrifying reality of the song’s title that authoritatively proclaims that “you’ll never leave Harlan Alive.”

      This list certainly does not exhaust the extent of Darrell Scott’s immeasurable songwriting prowess, but it shows his wide range of capabilities as a diverse composer and lyricist. He can do fun, heartbreak, inspirational, political, social commentary, fast, slow, etc. Moreover, he does it all with poignancy and wit, as it is appropriate.

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      Satirical Songs

      kinky-friedmanI’ve known about Kinky Friedman for some years now. Actually, I should be more specific and say that I’ve known Kinky Friedman’s name for quite some years now. Because, to be honest, the only thing I really knew about him until very recently is that Willie Nelson supported him for Texas Governor in 2006, which should have peaked my interest enough to research him back then.

      It wasn’t until recently, after doing an Amazon search for stray Todd Snider songs, that I realized that the colorful and fascinating Friedman, while politically extreme at times, was quite the singing satirist. On the 2006 album Why The Hell Not…The Songs of Kinky Friedman, I discovered an incredible cast of artists (Willie Nelson, Todd Snider, Bruce Robison, Asleep at the Wheel, Delbert McClinton, Charlie Robison, Dwight Yoakam, Kevin Fowler & Jason Boland) doing covers of Friedman’s songs, many so sharp that I was more than a little taken aback at first. Through satire and, sometimes, even seriousness, Freidman offers a lot of social commentary that is often colorful and always intriguing.

      Although Friedman’s original versions aren’t especially appe

      aling to me, the tribute album is engaging. Two songs in particular caught my attention right away. Kevin Fowler’s cover of “Get Your Biscuits in the Oven” and Todd Snider’s version of “They Ain’t Making Jews Like Jesus Anymore” are both addictively catchy and amusing. Snider’s song would easily fit next to his own socially charged compositions while Fowler’s choice is performed with a charming cheekiness.

      While it would be violating Country Universe’s comment policy to quote Todd Snider’s song that deals with racism, I will provide a sample of the lyrics from Fowler’s deliciously ridiculous ditty, which is hopefully extreme enough to be obviously satirical in nature as social commentary.

      Verse 1: You uppity women I don’t understand
      Why you gotta go and try to act like a man,
      But before you make your weekly visit to the shrink
      You’d better occupy the kitchen, liberate the sink.

      Chorus: Get your biscuits in the oven and your buns in the bed
      That’s what I to my baby said,
      Women’s liberation is a-going to your head,
      Get your biscuits in the oven and your buns in the bed.

      Kinky Friedman’s brand of social commentary may be understandably too inflammatory and extreme for many people, but my call to Country Universe readers tonight is to recommend a satirical song that you find appealing.

      zp8497586rq

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      Filed under Discussion

      Recommend A Track: Shot to The Heart

      kelly-and-bruceLast Thursday, Bill and I celebrated our fifth wedding anniversary. It’s been a wonderful run so far. Of all the positive things that I can say, my favorite thing about our marriage is that we are best friends. In fact, before we ever started dating, we were best friends. So, it’s nice that the same is still true today and it would be devistating if it should ever change.

      I’m certainly no marriage expert, but I think that being friends is central to a successful marriage. Not only does it make the days more bearable, it helps to insure that we will give to each other at least as much as we would to our friends.

      With that said, I am fully aware that being friends in a marriage isn’t always as easy as we would all hope it would be. Like any friendship, it’s something that must be worked on and cannot be taken for granted.

      As I listened to music today, “Friendless Marriage” from Bruce Robison’s Country Sunshine came on my iPod. Robison sings this heartbreakingly sad song with his wife, Kelly Willis. It’s always a treat when Willis joins her husband on a track, but this is an especially noteworthy collaboration. As is always the case when I hear”Friendless Marriage”, I was struck by their subdued performance of a song that never ceases to catch my attention and pierce my heart.

      Robison and Willis sing from the perspective of a couple who can remember a time when they were full of passion for each other. However, the passion is gone now and they’ve discovered that they have nothing left to hold onto. They’ve reconciled themselves to the knowledge that they’re in a friendless marriage. Robison’s character admits that the only thing that is holding them together is the obligation to responsibility that has been instilled in him by the example of family history:

      “She don’t seem to smile no more, or look me in the eye/I don’t say a thing at all or hold her when she cries/But we weren’t raised to run from our responsibilities/So I stay for my baby like my mama stayed for me.”

      What’s your recommendation?

       

      If you’re looking for direction:

      What powerful relationship song do you recommend?

      15 Comments

      Filed under Discussion, Miscellaneous Musings, Recommend a Track

      Texas Country

      texasStuck in my car stereo over the last couple of weeks has been a CD loaded with tunes from some of my favorite Texas-affiliated artists.  I’m a big fan of the singer-songwriter, old school and raggedy rock styles of country music, and Texas excels at all three. So any time I need a break from the current “Nashville sound,” I like to check in with Texas and see what they’re up to. Invariably, it’s more colorful and interesting.

      I can’ t call myself an expert on Texas country by any stretch of the imagination and my education is nowhere remotely near complete (hint: feel free to recommend), but I do sense that it’s a style of music, or perhaps a musical sensibility, that is extremely important to maintain.  Texas artists exude a certain spirit of creativity and sense of individuality that is sorely lacking elsewhere in country music.  And in my opinion, great music and great artists only flourish in settings where both of those are encouraged.

      Here’s a sampling of the songs I’m currently listening to:

      • “Dallas,” Jimmie Dale Gilmore
      • “Snowin’ on Raton,” Townes Van Zandt
      • “West Texas Waltz,” Joe Ely
      • “Greenville,” Lucinda Williams
      • “Tortured Tangled Hearts,” Dixie Chicks
      • “Transcendental Blues (Live in Austin),” Steve Earle
      • “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain,” Willie Nelson
      • “Treat Me Like a Saturday Night,” The Flatlanders
      • “Bourbon Legend,” Jason Boland & The Stragglers
      • “Jesus Was a Capricorn,” Kris Kristofferson
      • “Angry All The Time,” Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis
      • “What I Deserve,” Kelly Willis
      • “Old Five and Dimers,” Billie Joe Shaver
      • “Heartbreaker’s Hall of Fame,” Sunny Sweeney
      • “Only Daddy That’ll Walk the Line,” Waylon Jennings

      What are some of your favorite Texas country tunes?

      15 Comments

      Filed under Discussion, News