Tag Archives: Darryl Worley

Four Ways that 9/11 Changed Country Music

The terrorist attacks on American soil ten years ago changed the course of our nation’s history in far more significant ways than just its impact on country music.

But the fact is that country music was changed as well.  Here are the four biggest ways that it did, for better and for worse.

1. Alan Jackson Becomes a Legend

He was still getting solid radio airplay and record sales in 2001, but it seemed like his glory days were behind him. Then, he stepped on to the CMA Awards stage and debuted “Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)” to a stunned industry crowd on national television.

It was the perfect song by the perfect artist at the perfect time, and it launched an amazing return to the head of the pack.  The commercial success was great, but it’s worth noting that “Where Were You” served notice that he was undergoing an artistic renaissance as well.   The big hits that followed – “Drive (For Daddy Gene)”, “It’s Five O’ Clock Somewhere,” and “Remember When” – were the best of his career.  Heck, of anybody’s career.

2. Toby Keith Becomes a Superstar

On the same night that Jackson performed his instant classic, Toby Keith just sang his latest hit, the novelty number “I Wanna Talk About Me.”  But the following spring, he came out with the next quintessential post-9/11 anthem, “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue.”

While it didn’t lead to nearly the same level of artistic growth that Jackson experienced, it did launch Keith into the rarefied air of country superstardom.  For most of the next decade, he’d be an instant add at radio.  And if some of those hits made us wince, it was still great to see the finest male vocalist of his generation get his due.   For those of us who thought that he was robbed at radio and industry award shows in the nineties, it was rewarding to see him have his day.

3. The Politicization of Country Music

National unity began to fade in the run up to our invasion of Iraq, and country radio picked a side, much to the detriment of the format.  The shamelessly jingoistic “Have You Forgotten?” became a seven week #1 for Darryl Worley, while a criticism of President Bush wiped the Dixie Chicks off of the radio dial.

The upshot?  Country radio sent the message that if you weren’t on board with the Bush Administration, you better keep your mouth shut.   Then again, with Worley’s career fading soon after “Have You Forgotten?”, opening it was no guarantee for long-term success, either.

4. Female Domination of the Genre Evaporates

This was the worst of it.   Country record sales exploded in 2002, and the industry credited it to traditionalists Jackson and Keith.   Radio drew the conclusion that  listeners didn’t want any more pop-flavored country, despite the fact that two of the biggest selling albums of the year were by Shania Twain and Faith Hill.

Both ladies struggled at radio with their top-selling projects, and the careers of Lee Ann Womack and SHeDaisy nearly ended.   Even ten years later, with the top-selling artists being Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood, most female artists are still struggling to get radio play.

 

 

27 Comments

Filed under Miscellaneous Musings

The 30 Day Song Challenge: Day 2

Today’s category is… A Song You Hate.

Here are the staff picks:

Dan Milliken: Travie McCoy featuring Bruno Mars, “Billionaire”

I usually don’t hate music if it’s blatantly awful. That usually makes me love it. (I have especially great affection for the universally maligned “We Built This City” thanks to the efforts of Twitter queen Megan Amram.) What grates on me is the technically listenable stuff that is still, slyly, really bland and stupid. Travie McCoy offers some decent verses here atop an aesthetically pleasant track; but it all goes to wash if you try to digest the lyrics of Bruno Mars chorus, which earned extra hate-points for always tricking me into thinking “Santeria” was coming on the radio last year.

Tara Seetharam: Jason Aldean, “She’s Country”

There are certainly more fundamentally offensive songs out there, but this one elicits from me inexplicable anger. From its pounding pseudo-rock arrangement to Aldean’s spitfire delivery (of ridiculousness like “honey-dripping honey from a holler in Kentucky”), everything about the song feels so aggressive. And if you’ve ever been subjected to the rap re-mix without at least a drink in your hand, you have my deepest sympathy.

Kevin Coyne: Brad Paisley, “Little Moments”

It’s the most frustratingly condescending tribute to a wife since “Honey.” At least that Bobby Goldsboro classic was released before the women’s rights movement was in full swing.  Sure, at least he doesn’t kill her off in the end, but is death really a worse fate when compared to your husband living for those little moments when you show what a stupid little woman you are?

Leeann Ward: Darryl Worley, “Have You Forgotten?”

I can digest Toby Keith’s angry anthem much easier than Worley’s patronizing piece of manipulation. Even though I’m just as relieved as anyone to have Bin Laden gone, this song, like few others, still gets my blood boiling.

53 Comments

Filed under The 30 Day Song Challenge

The 201 Greatest Singles of the Decade, Part 3: #160-#141

The 201 Greatest Singles of the Decade, Part 3: #160-#141

lee-ann-womack-call-me-crazy

#160
“Last Call”
Lee Ann Womack
2008
Peak: #14

Womack’s second-best Aughts song about late-night temptations is still better than a lot of people’s first-best songs about anything. Even in avoiding her drunken ex’s advances, she sounds positively heartbroken, suggesting she’d gladly make the other decision if she didn’t know better. – Dan Milliken

159 Shania Up

#159
“She’s Not Just a Pretty Face”
Shania Twain
2003
Peak: #9

Her motivation for her music has always been escapism, but I love the personal touch she slips into this one. Her late mother is the one who she’s referring to when she sings “at night, she pumps gasoline.” – Kevin Coyne

Continue reading

17 Comments

Filed under Decade in Review

100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 1: #100-#91

Ah, the naughties. The decade began and ended with pop crossover queens, with Shania Twain and Faith Hill at the top of their game in 2000 much like Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood reign supreme today. In between, we had the roots music boom, best exemplified by O Brother and the platinum-selling Nickel Creek and Alison Krauss & Union Station; the post-9/11 patriotic explosion, which brought Toby Keith and Darryl Worley to the top of the charts; the near-total banishment of women from the country radio dial for a good part of the decade, which started to fade as redneck pride ascended, thanks to a certain woman trying to make Pocahontas proud; and far too many tributes to country living and island-flavored beach bum songs to count.

All of this made for a fascinating decade to be a country fan. As radio worked its way through all of the above (with the notable exception of roots music), the internet made it far easier for acts to be discovered without ever getting a single spin of traditional radio play.  With MySpace, YouTube, Facebook, and the explosion of country music blogs, the barriers have been torn down between artist and audience in a way that was never possible before.

The motley crew of Country Universe has a diversity of tastes that fit within the widest boundaries of country music, as reflected our collaborative list of the 100 best albums of the decade.  Five of our writers contributed to the list, with all writer’s selections being weighed equally.  We’ll reveal ten entries a day until the list is complete. A look back at the greatest singles of the decade will then follow.

    The 100 Greatest Albums of the Decade, Part 1

    Abigail 100

    #100
    Abigail Washburn, Song of the Traveling Daughter

    Song of the Traveling Daughter is the debut album from Uncle Earl claw hammer banjo player Abigail Washburn. Produced by Béla Fleck and featuring Ben Sollee, it is a subdued album filled with intriguing instrumentation and influences.  Standout songs include “Nobody’s Fault but Mine,” with its interesting Civil War period influence; the upbeat “Coffee’s Cold,” originally performed by Uncle Earl; and “Song of the Traveling Daughter,” based on the classical Chinese poem “Song of the Traveling Son.” – William Ward

    Recommended Tracks: “Nobody’s Fault but Mine”, “Coffee’s Cold”

    Kim Richey 99

    #99
    Kim Richey, Rise

    Her ambitious swan song for Mercury Records was perhaps her least accessible record, with an emphasis on eclectic arrangements instead of hook-laden melodies. It’s also her most deeply rewarding record, one that is remarkably introspective and fully delves into themes of faith and mortality that her earlier work had only hinted at before. – Kevin Coyne

    Recommended Tracks: “A Place Called Home”, “No Judges”

    Little Big Town 98

    #98
    Little Big Town, The Road to Here

    The quartet’s second album catapulted them to the forefront thanks to the swampy anthem, “Boondocks,” and was a breath of fresh, earthy air to mainstream country music. Packed with tight harmonies and songs ranging in style from bluegrass-leaning to Fleetwood Mac-inspired, the album served as a window into the raw talent and potential of one of the best groups to hit country music in quite some time. – Tara Seetharam

    Recommended Tracks: “Boondocks”, “Live With Lonesome”

    Dolly 97

    #97
    Dolly Parton, Halos & Horns

    A gorgeous, gospel-heavy album, with tasteful bluegrass elements. Parton is effervescent as usual, and rid of any self-consciousness, which makes “Hello God” overwhelmingly stirring. A response to the September 11 tragedies, the song has Parton pleading and philosophically wrestling with God, in the sincerest of ways. – TS

    Recommended Tracks: “Hello God”, “John Daniel”

    Brad 96

    #96
    Brad Paisley, Part II

    Sometime back before the Future, before the smirking social commentary and the endless odes to his wife, Brad Paisley was just a silly little neotraditionalist writing silly little neotraditional songs about the twists of everyday life and love. Part II captures him at his most unassuming and tuneful, waxing breezily about courtships and feeling out his new place as a neotrad spokesperson with a few classic roots songs, plus a cute Bill Anderson/Chuck Cannon co-write (“Too Country”). – Dan Milliken

    Recommended Tracks: “Wrapped Around”, “Come On Over Tonight”

    Patty 95

    #95
    Patty Loveless, Strong Heart

    More so than any Loveless album since leaving MCA, Strong Heart draws on her pop and rock influences, with a healthy dose of Ronstadt thrown in for good measure. The contrast between her hillbilly wail and the pop-leaning arrangements of several songs manages to make her sound even more rural than she normally does. Arguably her last mainstream project, she proved that she can sound just as good chasing radio as she does ignoring it. – KC

    Recommended Tracks: “The Last Thing On My Mind”, “My Heart Will Never Break This Way Again”

    Sara 94

    #94
    Sara Evans, Real Fine Place

    One of the finer female vocalists in the genre, Evans is a fantastic interpreter on her fifth album, carefully treading both traditional and pop country waters. The warmth and purity to her tone is prominent on this album, and this is particularly true of the songs with more traditional arrangements, on which she shines the brightest. – TS

    Recommended Tracks: “Cheatin’”, “These Four Walls”

    Sara J 93

    #93
    Sarah Jarosz, Song Up in Her Head

    Sarah Jarosz’ much hyped debut with Sugar Hill Records features Darrell Scott, Tim O’Brien, Jerry Douglas, Aofie O’Donavan, and Abigail Washburn.  Notable tracks include “Shankill Butchers,” a Decemberists cover that outperforms the original; the progressive acoustic “Song up in Her Head,” reminiscent of Nickel Creek; and “Come on Up to the House,” an impressive Tom Waits cover. – WW

    Recommended Tracks: “Shankill Butchers”, “Come On Up to the House”

    Terri 92

    #92
    Terri Clark, Pain to Kill

    This album made Clark a serious contender for Female Vocalist, the only time in her career that she reached that level of success. It’s as radio-friendly as her first two albums, but the material is substantive. This is the best collection of songs that she ever assembled, and by a healthy margin. When Trisha Yearwood finds something to cover from a record, you’ve done a great job picking songs. – KC

    Recommended Tracks: “I Just Called to Say Goodbye”, “Not a Bad Thing”

    Dwight 91

    #91
    Dwight Yoakam, Population: Me

    Genre superhero Yoakam stretched his habit of excellence into a third decade, beginning with the quirky South of Heaven, West of Hell soundtrack and continuing with this solid set. The album is notable for distilling a wide assortment of Yoakam’s mastered sounds into about half an hour, from the Eaglesy (“The Late Great Golden State”) to the Owensy (“No Such Thing”) to the Elvisy (“I’d Avoid Me Too”), all united by the singer’s uniquely buoyant brand of fatalism. – DM

    Recommended Tracks: “I’d Avoid Me Too”, “The Back Of Your Hand”

    - – -

    20 Comments

    Filed under Decade in Review

    The Worst Singles of the Decade, Part 3: #30-#21

    It Stinks!After  Part 1 and Part 2 , we’re wading further into the sea of mediocrity.

    The Worst Singles of the Decade, Part 3: #30-#21

    #30
    Terri Clark, “Dirty Girl”

    Double entendres are a lot more enjoyable when the naughty meaning is the real one.

    #29
    Jamey Johnson, “The Dollar”

    Real kids don’t talk like this.

    #28
    Garth Brooks & Trisha Yearwood, “Love Will Always Win”

    This treacly ballad is the nadir of Trisha’s career and one “It’s Midnight Cinderella” away from being Garth’s as well.

    #27
    Darryl Worley, “Have You Forgotten?”

    Featuring more straw men than a Wizard of Oz audition.

    #26
    Clint Black, “I Raq and Roll”

    “Have You Forgotten?” without all the nuance and subtlety.

    #25
    Shania Twain and Billy Currington, “Party For Two”

    Proof positive that spoken dialogue can ruin a song before it even begins.

    #24
    Martina McBride, “God’s Will”
    He was dressed as a bag of leaves? That’s his costume? Hey, at least she didn’t kill him off in the last verse.

    #23
    Brooks & Dunn, “Play Something Country”

    There are so many poorly written female characters in Brooks & Dunn songs, it’s hard to pick just one to represent them all. But I’ll give the nod to this one, simply because it has her howling the title to a melodic hook that’s a blatant rip-off of Mary Chapin Carpenter’s “Shut Up and Kiss Me.”

    #22
    Jason Aldean, “Johnny Cash”

    The “country star as song name” trend hasn’t yielded anything worthwhile, but at least “Tim McGraw” and “Kristofferson” have some tenuous connection to their titular song. “Johnny Cash” is just shameless name-dropping.

    #21
    Gretchen Wilson, “Red Bird Fever”

    In retrospect, this should’ve been a huge red flag that Wilson wasn’t built to last.  My personal favorite moment of this St. Louis Cardinals shout-out comes in the chorus, when she sings “Let me get a big ‘Go Cards!’ from the Red Bird fans like me. Go Cards!” and the backup singers answer back, “Hell yeah!”  because they couldn’t be bothered to change the “Redneck Woman” backing track.

    30 Comments

    Filed under Decade in Review

    Album Sales Update: July 2009

    It’s time for an album sales update, our first since May 23.   Brad Paisley is off to a strong start with American Saturday Night, selling 130k in its first week. That’s about 70k less than his previous two studio albums – Time Well Wasted and 5th Gear – opened with, but not a terrible drop-off, considering the state of the music market.

    Meanwhile, the new studio albums by Rascal Flatts and Keith Urban are slowing down considerably, now being outpaced on a weekly basis by 2008 releases by Taylor Swift, Zac Brown Band, Darius Rucker and Lady Antebellum.

    Among younger acts with a new album in 2009, the most impressive sales are coming from Jason Aldean, while 2008 releases from Kellie Pickler, Billy Currington, and Randy Houser are showing new signs of life.

    Biggest disappointments? It’s hard not to look in the direction of Martina McBride, who has barely cleared the 100k mark on her new studio set.  Lee Ann Womack’s 2008 set just made it over that mark, too.  Then again, one only needs to have sold 455 copies to make the chart this week, with the anchor position going to Wynonna with that total. Her covers album Sing – Chapter 1 has sold 41k to date.

    Here are the latest totals for albums released over the past three years that are still charting:

    2009

    • Rascal Flatts, Unstoppable – 842,000
    • Keith Urban, Defying Gravity – 452,000
    • Jason Aldean, Wide Open – 384,000
    • Kenny Chesney, Greatest Hits II – 281,000
    • Dierks Bentley, Feel That Fire – 219,000
    • Martina McBride, Shine – 104,000
    • John Rich, Son of a Preacher Man – 103,000
    • Eric Church, Carolina – 94,000
    • Rodney Atkins, It’s America – 88,000
    • Jake Owen, Easy Does It – 81,000
    • Randy Travis, I Told You So: Ultimate Hits – 78,000
    • Montgomery Gentry, For Our Heroes – 64,000
    • Willie Nelson & Asleep at the Wheel, Willie & The Wheel – 56,000
    • Steve Earle, Townes – 47,000
    • Colt Ford, Ride Through the Country – 45,000
    • Jason Michael Carroll, Growing Up is Getting Old – 45,000
    • Wynonna, Sing – Chapter 1 – 41,000
    • Hank Williams Jr. – 127 Rose Avenue – 34,000
    • Ryan Bingham, Roadhouse Sun – 15,000
    • Tracy Lawrence, Rock – 11,000
    • Darryl Worley, Sounds Like Life – 8,000
    • Holly Williams, Here With Me – 5,000
    • Charlie Robison, Beautiful Day – 3,000
    • Tanya Tucker, My Turn – 3,000

    2008

    • Taylor Swift, Fearless – 3,464,000
    • Sugarland, Love on the Inside – 1,683,000
    • George Strait, Troubadour – 914,000
    • Alan Jackson, Good Time – 869,000
    • Darius Rucker, Learn to Live – 754,000
    • Kenny Chesney, Lucky Old Sun – 721,000
    • Zac Brown Band, Foundation – 681,000
    • Rascal Flatts, Greatest Hits Vol. 1 – 680,000
    • Lady Antebellum, Lady Antebellum – 674,000
    • Toby Keith, 35 Biggest Hits – 652,000
    • Jamey Johnson, That Lonesome Song – 509,000
    • Toby Keith, That Don’t Make Me a Bad Guy – 403,000
    • James Otto, Sunset Man – 374,000
    • Julianne Hough, Julianne Hough – 314,000
    • Kellie Pickler, Kellie Pickler – 261,000
    • Dierks Bentley, Greatest Hits – 255,000
    • Brad Paisley, Play – 247,000
    • Dolly Parton, Backwoods Barbie – 208,000
    • Tim McGraw, Greatest Hits Vol. 3 – 206,000
    • Billy Currington, Little Bit of Everything – 191,000
    • Trace Adkins, X – 185,000
    • Montgomery Gentry, Back When I Knew it All – 184,000
    • Joey + Rory, Life of a Song – 167,000
    • Blake Shelton, Startin’ Fires – 165,000
    • Eli Young Band, Jet Black and Jealous – 108,000
    • Lee Ann Womack, Call Me Crazy – 102,000
    • Craig Morgan, Greatest Hits – 81,000
    • Hank Williams III, Damn Right Rebel Proud – 80,000
    • Randy Houser, Anything Goes – 79,000
    • Lost Trailers, Holler Back – 69,000

    2006-2007

    • Taylor Swift, Taylor Swift – 4,129,000
    • Carrie Underwood, Carnival Ride – 2,918,000

    10 Comments

    Filed under Crunching the Numbers, News

    Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters: Darrell Scott

    darrell-scottI’m pleased to introduce a new feature to Country Universe readers, which is a spin off of Favorite Songs by Favorite Artists called Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters.

    While we all appreciate songwriters for their invaluable contributions to our favorite artists, they still often remain unrecognized as the people behind the scenes and, therefore, stand in the shadows of the big name artists who sing their songs. The purpose of this feature is to spotlight those songwriters who had or have aspirations of being stars, but are better known for sharing their craft with the more visible artists.

    Therefore, the criteria for this feature is that the spotlighted songwriter has to have both written songs that other artists have recorded and recorded music of his/her own. For instance, Darrell Scott, Rodney Crowell, Radney Foster, Kris Kristofferson, Bruce Robison, etc. are eligible songwriters, since they’ve recorded their own music and written songs for other artists. Conversely, people like Alan Jackson, Garth Brooks, Randy Travis, Clint Black etc. won’t be eligible, since they’ve mostly only written songs for themselves and not others.

    Finally, Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters will include a mix of songs that the songwriter has recorded, and songs that he/she has written that other artists have recorded, which will obviously depend on our favorite songs by that songwriter and our preferred version of the chosen song.

    With this feature, we hope to help readers realize the contributions of individual songwriters and, perhaps, inspire you to explore the artists’ own discographies as a result.

    Last summer I kicked off our Songwriters Series with my favorite modern country music songwriter, Darrell Scott. So, I thought it fitting to do the same with this new feature. Since I’ve already taken up considerable space describing this feature, I encourage you all to refer to my aforementioned spotlight to learn more about the man about which this article is written.

    A pertinent note, however, is that most of the songs on this list have been recorded by both Scott and other artists. While the majority of the songs on this particular list will specifically refer to other artists, please assume that Scott’s own recordings are more than worth exploring as well.

    #15

    Darrell Scott, “Banjo Clark”
    Aloha From Nashville

    One of the things that I marvel the most about Darrell Scott is his ability to write songs that sound like timeless standards. “Banjo Clark” is one such song. In fact, I had to double check to make sure Scott had actually written this song and that it wasn’t a public domain standard that he revived.

    #14

    Tim McGraw, “Old Town New”
    Live Like You Were Dying

    Scott wrote “Old Town New” with another superb modern songwriter, Bruce Robison. So, it’s no surprise that this song about a man wishing that he could make his old town feel new again after a failed relationship is good. While it remained just an album cut on McGraw’s signature album, it’s as good as many of the singles that were released from it.

    #13

    Suzy Bogguss, “No Way Out”
    Give Me Some Wheels

    “No Way Out” is up-tempo, but is not devoid of life’s realities. The family experiences familiar hardships, but the husband and wife hold themselves accountable by reminding each other that they’ve “fell in love and there’s no way out.”

    While Bogguss’ recording is the superior version, both Darrel Scott’s and Julie Roberts’ versions are good as well. Moreover, this is the first song of Scott’s that was recorded by another artist.

    #12

    Darrell Scott, “When There’s No One Around”

    Family Tree

    Garth Brooks recorded a version of “When There’s No One Around”, but Scott’s version is more organic and sonically appealing. It’s a poignant look at who we are when there’s no one around, which is inevitably different than our public personas.

    #11

    Travis Tritt, “It’s A Great Day to Be Alive”
    Down the Road I Go

    We  all know “It’s A Great Day to Be Alive”, since it was a big hit for Travis Tritt. This song has been recorded by Scott and Cory Morrow. Tritt’s is the definitive version, however. It tries to be hopeful while still somehow managing to feel a little bleak at the same time. While he proclaims that it’s a great day to be alive, there’s a sadness that lurks under the surface that seems to threaten the bright outlook, which is actually more tangible in Scott’s recording.

    #10

    Darrell Scott, “With A Memory Like Mine”

    Real Time

    “With A Memory Like Mine” was co-written with his dad, Wayne Scott. Darrell found the beginnings of this song in a notebook of his father’s and encouraged the Elder Scott to finish it with him. Scott’s version, which can be found on a solid project with Tim O’Brien, is darker than the quick paced recording by The John Cowan Band, which is more appropriate for this chillingly sad song. The man sends his son off to war by telling him to “be a good soldier/but return again someday.” His son does return, but in the most devastating way possible for a parent. In a casket.

    #9

    Martina McBride, “I’m Trying”

    Shine

    “I’m Trying” has been recorded by both Diamond Rio as a duet with Chely Wright and Martina McBride, though McBride’s is the stronger version. It explores a struggling relationship that almost seems like more work than it’s worth. Instead of leaving us with a typical happy or tragic ending, we are only given an assurance that they love each other and they are trying to make things work. The melody is tastefully simple with a fitting production that showcases McBride’s atypical restrained vocals, which translates into appropriate empathy for the characters within the song. It is a simple song with a simple production, but still poignant in a quiet way.

    #8

    Trace Adkins, “Someday”

    More

    Adkins is the only artist to record this song, as far as I know. It’s a beautiful and hopeful song, with tinges of sadness. As is duly noted about Adkins, he sings these more serious songs the best, even if radio disagrees.

    #7

    Dixie Chicks, “Heartbreak Town”

    Fly

    This is an indictment on Nashville, which is one of two songs written by Scott and recorded by The Chicks that tackles the topic. The song portrays Nashville, a place where so many people hope to enjoy success, as a “heartbreak town, which is something that both the Chicks and Scott have surely learned from personal experience.

    #6

    Kathy Mattea, “Loves Not Through With You Yet”

    Right Out of Nowhere

    I’m thrilled that one of my favorite Mattea albums includes this thoughtful, gorgeous Celtic flavored song by Darrell Scott: “You may think that love takes two, but loves a gift from you to you.”

    #5

    Sara Evans, “Born to Fly”

    Born to Fly

    Scott happened to write one of Sara Evans’ most recognizable and best hits to date. “Born to Fly” is an infectious coming of age song. While her parents are stable and grounded, that’s not the way the songs’ character wishes to live and she asks, “How do you keep your feet on the ground when you know you were born to fly?”

    #4

    Darryl Worley, “Family Tree”

    I Miss My Friend

    While many of Scott’s songs can be heavy, this is an example of his sillier side. Scott does a great version, but Worley cuts loose just the right amount. He clearly revels in singing deliciously smarmy lyrics like, “Well, raisin’ up babies is our new sport/You’re one day late and I’m one dollar short/Now, maybe it was planned or maybe it was a goof/But a cat’s got to dance on a hot tin roof.”

    #3

    Darrell Scott, “Goodle’ USA”

    The Invisible Man

    A more watered down version of this song can be heard on Faith Hill’s album. If one doesn’t listen closely, it’s easy to miss the probing lyrics that question the state of America. While Scott’s recording is not quite as polished, the political message is much more overt, which includes his original lyrics that were altered for Hill’s version to be less controversial.

    #2

    Dixie Chicks, “Long Time Gone”

    Home

    This is the other song that was written by Scott and recorded by The Chicks that takes Nashville to task. Wrapped in an unshakably catchy melody, “Long Time Gone” disregards conventional niceties and tersely critiques the music that’s being played on the radio:

    “Now me and Delia singin’ every Sunday
    Watchin’ the children and the garden grow
    We listen to the radio to hear what’s cookin’
    But the music ain’t got no soul

    Now they sound tired but they don’t sound Haggard
    They got money but they don’t have cash
    They got Junior but they don’t have Hank
    I think, I think, I think…the rest is…
    A long Time Gone”

    #1

    Patty Loveless, “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive”

    Mountain Soul

    Patty Loveless’ recording of “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive” sounds like a superb arrangement of a forgotten classic, except it isn’t a remake and was written just over ten years ago. While I feel the definitive version was recorded by Patty Loveless, Darrell Scott has recorded two versions that, even if Loveless’ version did not exist, would earn a spot on this list. Through haunting lyrics and melodic structure, “Harlan” tells the tragic story of the bleak existence of coalminers that is just about inevitable:

    “But the times got hard and tobacco wasn’t selling
    And old granddad knew what he’d do to survive
    He went and dug for Harlan coal
    And sent the money back to grandma
    But he never left Harlan alive

    Where the sun comes up about ten in the mornin’
    And the sun goes down about three in the day
    And you’ll fill your cup with whatever bitter brew you’re drinkin’
    And you spend your life just thinkin’ of how to get away”

    Patty Loveless sings this song with an immense emotional intensity that was likely gathered from personal experience as a daughter of a coalmining father who eventually succumbed to “Black Lung Disease” as a result of coalmining in Kentucky. In fact, each person who has sung this song so far, including Darrell Scott himself, has a personal and deep understanding of the significance of the hopelessness that the lyrics convey, since Brad Paisley, Kathy Mattea and Scott also lived in coalmining towns as children. Consequently, they were all exposed to the horrifying reality of the song’s title that authoritatively proclaims that “you’ll never leave Harlan Alive.”

    This list certainly does not exhaust the extent of Darrell Scott’s immeasurable songwriting prowess, but it shows his wide range of capabilities as a diverse composer and lyricist. He can do fun, heartbreak, inspirational, political, social commentary, fast, slow, etc. Moreover, he does it all with poignancy and wit, as it is appropriate.

    14 Comments

    Filed under Favorite Songs by Favorite Songwriters

    Review: Darryl Worley, “Sounds Like Life to Me”

    darryl-worleyListening to the Darryl Worley single, my mind kept drifting to one of my favorite Simpsons episodes. Apu, proprietor of the Kwik-E-Mart, has recently become the father of octuplets. He hasn’t slept in weeks, and he’s struggling with exhaustion as he tries to finish his workday. In walks ever-chipper Ned Flanders:

    Ned: Well, morning Apu. How are the little blessings?

    Apu: They’re a ravenous sworm of locusts just eating and screaming and grabbing and poking and pulling and drooling, and two have cradle rash. How do you get cradle rash when you sleep in a suitcase?

    Ned: [chuckles] They can be a handful… of joy!

    Apu: Shut up!

    Ned: They’ll fill your lives with -

    Apu: SHUT UP!

    Ned: [quickly] Can’t put a price on a miracle!

    Apu: I can’t believe you don’t shut up!

    Perhaps if he’d been allowed to finish, Ned would’ve told Apu, “Sounds like life to me!”

    Here’s the setup:  Worley has been summoned by his friend’s wife, who claims that her hubby has fallen off the wagon. Worley finds him drinking at a local watering hole, and asks his friend what the problem is. Well, it seems that the stress of raising a family has gotten to him. He’s having trouble paying the bills, he never has a moment to rest, and his wife is two months late.

    Worley’s response? Well, what the heck did you expect life to be like, good friend! Stop your whining and head back home. Or has he puts it, “I know it’s tough, but you got to suck it up.”

    Hey, I’ve heard quite a bit of 21st century country music. I get the message the song is trying to send: “I know you’re thinking ‘there goes my life,’ but hurry back to your front porch looking in because you’re gonna miss this.” But a good friend in this situation would just let his friend vent, buy him one more round, and give him a ride home.

    Quite frankly, the friend’s venting would make for a far more interesting and believable country song, perhaps one that doesn’t make me want to say, “Shut up. Shut up! I can’t believe you don’t shut up!”

    Grade: C

    Listen: Sounds Like Life to Me

    18 Comments

    Filed under Single Reviews

    CMA Flashback: Horizon Award (New Artist)

    For a look back at the other major categories, visit our CMA Awards page.

    2010

    • Luke Bryan
    • Easton Corbin
    • Jerrod Neimann
    • Chris Young
    • Zac Brown Band

    Usually there isn’t this much turnover in this race unless most of last year’s nominees are ineligible.  This year, only one of the four eligible nominees from last year – Zac Brown Band – earns a nomination.  With their massive success and their multiple nominations, they’ve got an excellent shot at winning. Then again, Easton Corbin is elsewhere on the ballot, too. It could be a horse race.
    2009

    • Randy Houser
    • Jamey Johnson
    • Jake Owen
    • Darius Rucker
    • Zac Brown Band

    Thirteen years after winning the Best New Artist Grammy as part of Hootie & The Blowfish, Darius Rucker won the country music equivalent, adding an exclamation point to the most successful pop-to-country crossover in a generation.

    lady-antebellum2008

    • Jason Aldean
    • Rodney Atkins
    • Lady Antebellum
    • James Otto
    • Kellie Pickler

    The industry favorites Lady Antebellum became the fourth band in history to win this award, following Rascal Flatts, Dixie Chicks and Sawyer Brown.

    2007

    • Jason Aldean
    • Rodney Atkins
    • Little Big Town
    • Kellie Pickler
    • Taylor Swift

    In the year since winning the Horizon Award, Swift has solidified her position as the genre’s most successful rising star.  While her debut album hasn’t reached the sales heights of the first discs by previous winners Carire Underwood and Gretchen Wilson, Swift is still one of the genre’s only significant sellers.

    2006

    • Miranda Lambert
    • Little Big Town
    • Sugarland
    • Josh Turner
    • Carrie Underwood

    I had a sneaking suspicion that Josh Turner was going to take this home, but as I’ve said before, Carrie’s got the best pipes since Trisha Yearwood. That she’ was acknowledged for that at such an early stage of her career is pretty amazing. Somehow I think the thrill of winning Horizon was short-lived, as winning Female Vocalist the same night left that memory in the dust.

    2005

    • Dierks Bentley
    • Big & Rich
    • Miranda Lambert
    • Julie Roberts
    • Sugarland

    Four of these five were nominees again the following year, and all in categories besides just Horizon, though Lambert got another shot at that as well. I think Big & Rich and Sugarland are making the most interesting music, and they’re moving more units than Bentley, though he’s no slouch himself. The CMA showed good judgment this year.

    Continue reading

    14 Comments

    Filed under CMA Awards

    Darryl Worley, "Tequila on Ice"

    Worley goes mellow on his first single for his new label, Stroudavarious Records.   The song is so laid back that it's easy to miss the charming lyric.  While it's nice to hear him explore the nuances of his voice, th

    is would benefit from a stronger backing track with more compelling instrumentation.

    Regardless, it's nice to have him back.  Darryl Worley's one of the past decade's most underrated talents, and while this song isn't among his greatest performances, it's a reasonably good effort.

    Grade: B

    Listen: Tequila on Ice

    zp8497586rq

    7 Comments

    Filed under Single Reviews