Hank Williams

Daily Top Five: Favorite Country Name Drop Songs

August 12, 2015 // 34 Comments

Ah…Remember the days when  a name drop of a country singer actually meant something and made sense within the context of the song? Before Jason Aldean’s gratuitous and inane name checks of Johnny Cash, Alabama and even Joe Diffie? Those were the days, weren’t they? What are some of your favorite songs that refer to country singers or country songs? Don Williams, “Good Old Boys Like Me” (Hank Williams) Vince Gill, “Some Things Never Get Old” (Emmylou Harris’ “Bluebird Wine”) Rodney Crowell, “Walk the Line Revisited” (Johnny Cash) Ashley Monroe, “Hank’s Cadillac” (Hank Williams) Josh Turner, “Loretta Lynn’s Lincoln”

Daily Top Five: Dog Songs

July 24, 2015 // 14 Comments

In tribute to my wonderful old dog who will be turning 14 in October, here are five of my favorite dog songs. Tom T. Hall, “Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine” Pirates of the Mississippi, “feed Jake” Hank Williams, “Move It on Over” Blake Shelton, “Ol’ Red” The Be Good Tanyas, “Dog Song, aka., Sleep Dog Lullaby”

Daily Top Five: Twitter Country

June 1, 2015 // 4 Comments

We’ve been beefing up our activity on Twitter of late– for those of you not following us yet, you’ll never in a million years believe that our name is @CountryUniverse— and have been enjoying the opportunity to engage with our readers– and, on occasion, with the artists we’ve written about– using that platform. So, for this Daily Top Five, we’ve listed some of our most essential, “Must Follow” Twitter accounts! Country Music News, Culture, & Humor: 1). Windmills Country (@WindmillsMusic) You want opinions that are driven by real data and thoughtful, incisive analysis? No one does it better. 2). Grady Smith (@gradywsmith) The in-house country music columnist for The Guardian has truly stepped up in a post-Chris Neal, post-Chet Flippo world. 3). Americana Music Association (@AmericanaFest) Essential coverage of the artists we love who reside on the fringes of the country universe. 4). Jessica Northey (@JessicaNorthey) No one works harder Read More

100 Greatest Men: #1. Merle Haggard

August 15, 2014 // 14 Comments

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List The Poet of the Common Man.  Merle Haggard emerged from the Bakersfield music scene in the mid-sixties, and over the course of time, became the greatest man in the history of country music. Born during the height of the Great Depression, the son of a honky tonk fiddler and a church-going mother, Haggard’s life was a hard one from early on.  When he lost his father at age nine, he rebelled to the point that much of his youth was spent in juvenile detention centers.  His only positive outlet was country music, and he listened to and studied obsessively the work of his heroes Bob Willis, Hank Williams, and Lefty Frizzell, all of whom would shape his singing and his songwriting.

100 Greatest Men: #5. Hank Williams

August 15, 2014 // 1 Comment

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List So epic was his life story, and so tragic its ending, that it’s easy to forget a simple truth: Hank Williams was one of the strongest vocalists and songwriters to ever grace the country music genre. Williams hailed from Alabama, and played guitar from a very young age.  He was drawn to both country and the blues, and by his teens, was already an established performer on the local scene.  He formed a band called the Drifting Cowboys, and was soon singing regularly on the radio, where he was dubbed, “the Singing Kid.”

100 Greatest Men: #6. Jimmie Rodgers

August 14, 2014 // 2 Comments

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List All of country music history is connected by its tradition, with the artists of one generation tracing their sound back to the generations that came before.  For male country singers, all roads eventually lead back to Jimmie Rodgers.What is all the more remarkable about his lasting influence is that Rodgers only recorded for six years. Rodger was born and raised in Meridian, Mississippi.  His father was a railroad man, which is a line of work that would later feature heavily in his material.   He loved music from a young age, even as he was running wild in pool halls and dive bars before he even reached his teens.  He won a singing contest at age 12, and it inspired him to pursue music as a career.

100 Greatest Men: #19. Webb Pierce

August 12, 2014 // 2 Comments

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List Rocketing to stardom in the aftermath of Hank Williams’ death, Webb Pierce became country music’s biggest superstar in the 1950’s, dominating the charts and establishing a flamboyant style that would become forever associated with traditional, honky-tonk country music. Pierce grew up in Louisiana, cutting his teeth on Jimmie Rodgers records and already developing his own sound by his teenage years.  At age fifteen, he already had a weekly radio show, performing his combination of the Cajun sounds of his home state and the Western Swing that was dominating country music at the time.

100 Greatest Men: #23. Charley Pride

July 6, 2014 // 6 Comments

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List Over the course of just fourteen years, Charley Pride accumulated 29 #1 country hits, proof positive that his switch from professional baseball to music was the right one. Pride hailed from Sledge, Mississippi, one of eleven sharecropper children.  He was a guitar player early on, but he first made his name in baseball, playing in both the Negro League and on several minor league baseball teams, including the Memphis Red Sox and the Boise Yankees.   His career was derailed by a stint in the Army, followed by an arm injury that made his signature pitching an impossibility.   He worked construction while unsuccessfully auditioning for baseball teams, then turned his attention to music.

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