Tag Archives: Jo Dee Messina

The Worst Singles of the Decade, Part 2: #40-#31

thumbs downThe banality continues. Read Part 1 here.

The Worst Singles of the Decade, Part 2: #40-#31

#40
Kenny Chesney & George Strait, “Shiftwork”

A stab at the working class blues still ends up on a tropical island by the third verse.

#39
Anita Cochran featuring The Voice of Conway Twitty, “(I Wanna Hear) A Cheatin’ Song”

In which a duet is formed from beyond the grave by chopping up bits and pieces of old Conway Twitty songs and reassembling them word by word.

#38
Billy Dean, “Let Them Be Little”

Thirty seconds in and you’ll be headed to your dentist for a cavity filling.

#37
Montgomery Gentry, “She Couldn’t Change Me”

Sorry boys, but “some hip-hop mess” would be a great improvement over this hillbilly trainwreck.

#36
Sarah Johns, “The One in the Middle”

Does anybody really need this gesture explained to them for four minutes? The whole point of using it is so you don’t have to talk to the person.

#35
Chuck Wicks, “Stealing Cinderella”

It’s hard to believe that you’re stealing Cinderella when you sing like you’re looking for Prince Charming.

#34
Faith Hill, “The Way You Love Me”

If my wife could only grant me one wish, and she actually chose for me to see the way that I kiss, I’d grant her divorce papers in return.

#33
Tracy Byrd, “Drinkin’ Bone”

Why come up with something original when you can just corrupt a nursery rhyme?

#32
Jo Dee Messina, “Biker Chick”

She’s not just any plain old biker chick. She’s a biker chick chick, a biker chick chick.

#31
Buddy Jewell, “This Ain’t Mexico”

You think he’s mad now? Wait until he gets to heaven and finds out God chose Pablo and Juanita to help pour out the rain.


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Women of the Decade

reba-mcentireCountry Universe contributor and reader Cory DeStein flagged this rundown from Billboard regarding women on the charts this decade:

PERFECT 10: On Country Songs, Carrie Underwood ropes her 10th top 10, as “Cowboy Casanova” climbs 11-8. With the advance, Underwood now stands alone in first-place for most top 10s on the chart among solo women this decade.

Here are the solo females with the most top 10s on Country Songs since 2000:

10, Carrie Underwood
9, Faith Hill
9, Martina McBride
8, Taylor Swift
7, Sara Evans
7, Reba McEntire
6, Jo Dee Messina
5, LeAnn Rimes
5, Gretchen Wilson
4, Shania Twain

Notably, the artist who led the category among women last decade did so with almost three times as many top 10s. Reba McEntire ranked first among solo women in the ’90s with 27 top 10s on Country Songs. Trisha Yearwood placed second with 18 between 1990 and 1999, and Faith Hill, Patty Loveless and Tanya Tucker each posted 14 in that span.

The decline in fortune for women at radio this decade is even more pronounced when you compare the above top ten to the previous decade:

Most Top Ten Singles by a Female Artist – 1990-1999:

  1. Reba McEntire (27)
  2. Trisha Yearwood (18)
  3. Faith Hill (14)
  4. Patty Loveless (14)
  5. Tanya Tucker (14)
  6. Pam Tillis (13)
  7. Lorrie Morgan (12)
  8. Shania Twain (12)
  9. Wynonna (11)
  10. Martina McBride (10)

That’s ten women who matched Underwood’s total for this decade. That Underwood didn’t even hit the top ten for the first time until late 2005 shows how bleak it was at radio for female artists this year.

But this comparison doesn’t even tell the whole story. Take a look at the list of women with the most top ten singles two decades ago:

Most Top Ten Singles by a Female Artist – 1980-1989:

  1. Reba McEntire (23)
  2. Crystal Gayle (22)
  3. Dolly Parton (21)
  4. Janie Fricke (17)
  5. Barbara Mandrell (17)
  6. Rosanne Cash (16)
  7. Emmylou Harris (16)
  8. Anne Murray (14)
  9. Tanya Tucker (12)
  10. Kathy Mattea (10)

Notice the trend? This decade, the top ten women combined for a total of 70 top ten hits. In the 90′s, the top ten women enjoyed a total of 145 top ten hits. In the eighties, a total of 168 top ten hits.  Even the nineties list is dominated by women who were played heavily in the earlier part of the decade.

What’s strange is that it was in the mid-nineties that female artists became the dominant commercial force in country music. Janie Fricke never had a gold album. Shania Twain has sold 48 million albums. Yet Fricke  had more top ten hits in just the eighties than Shania Twain has earned in her entire career.  Record buyers have wholeheartedly embraced Alison Krauss and Miranda Lambert, but despite their strong sales, they’ve each enjoyed only one solo top ten hit.

So what to make of all of this?  Is the recent success of Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood an indication that things are improving for women on the radio dial? Is it worth noting that Sugarland and Jennifer Nettles (11 top ten hits) and the Dixie Chicks (14 top ten hits) have done their part to compensate for this lack of gender parity? Does it even matter that radio is playing women less often each decade, especially if record buyers are finding their music anyway?

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Marcel, “Believin’”

marcelIt is no secret that I have an unexplainable soft spot for

Marcel. His songs are often silly and his voice is unpolished, though irresistibly charming, but he is also capable of turning a phrase.

In his latest song, “Believin’”, which is similar in perspective to Jo Dee Messina’s “I’m Alright,” Marcel reveals the struggles that he has undergone as the result of a largely disappointing and mostly unsuccessful music career. While he holds out hope, he acknowledges that it hasn’t been easy or glamorous: “Don’t have two pennies to rub, but my card still slides./What good is life if you’re not livin’?/Makin’ minimum payments is part of my cadence,/Just waitin’ to get back what I’ve given.”

The song’s content certainly comes from an honest place and Marcel’s delivery is palpably sincere. Furthermore, while some of the lyrics are rather unoriginal, particularly the chorus, there are other parts of the song where the lyrics are actually intriguing. The song, however, greatly suffers from a hokey melody and an uninspiring production that cannot be overlooked when it comes right down to it, no matter how much I may be pulling for him.

Grade: C-

Listen: Marcel, “Believin’”


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Jo Dee Messina, “Shine”

jo-dee-messinaJo Dee Messina’s singles generally into two categories: empowering anthems and sardonic kiss-off numbers. Her best singles, like “Bye Bye” and “Downtime”, are a little bit of both.

Given the title, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out which type of song “Shine” is. She’s had enough of looking at the glass half empty and is now determined to live her life to the fullest, taking every moment that she can to shine.

It’s decent enough, but the problem with releasing so many songs in the same vein is that the new releases are invariably stacked up against the old ones. In this case, the comparison does “Shine” few favors.

It doesn’t feature the energetic spark normally associated with Messina’s spurts of positivity, and she sounds more resigned to her life rather than reinvigorated by it. It doesn’t help that the production has such little luster, a strange choice to make for a song that is trumpeting the sunny side of life.

Grade: B-

Listen: Shine

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Grammy Flashback: Best Female Country Vocal Performance

Revised and Updated for 2009

While the Grammys have honored country music from the very first ceremony in 1959, they did not begin honoring by gender until 1965, when the country categories were expanded along with the other genre categories.

This is a look back at the Best Female Country Vocal Performance category. It was first awarded in 1965, an included single competing with albums until the Best Country Album category was added in 1995. When an album is nominated, it is in italics, and a single track is in quotation marks.

I’ve often made the case that female artists were making the best music in the 1990s, and the Grammys did a great job nominating songs and albums that were ignored at the CMA and ACM awards, which is not surprising, given that those shows have so few categories that are actually for songs and albums.

As usual, we start with a look at this year’s nominees and work our way back.

2009

  • Martina McBride, “For These Times”
  • LeAnn Rimes, “What I Cannot Change”
  • Carrie Underwood, “Last Name”
  • Lee Ann Womack, “Last Call”
  • Trisha Yearwood, “This is Me You’re Talking To”

This year’s lineup includes three former winners and two women looking for their first victory in this category. Martina McBride is in the running for the eighth time in fifteen years, and with one of her more understated performances. Lee Ann Womack returns for a fifth time, having received a nomination for the lead single of her five most recent albums. Both ladies turned in good performances here, but they’ve been overlooked for records bigger and better, so they’re not likely to snap their losing streaks this time around.

As for the previous winners, LeAnn Rimes earned her third consecutive nod, bringing her total to five in this category. She hasn’t won since 1997, when she took home the award for “Blue.” If enough voters hear “What I Cannot Change,” she might have a shot, though the only version of the song that’s been a legitimate hit has been the dance remix.

Trisha Yearwood won in 1998 for “How Do I Live,” her only victory to date. But she’s earned her tenth nomination for “This is Me You’re Talking To,” which is arguably her strongest vocal performance of the ten. Like Rimes, the challenge is getting enough voters to listen to it, but she’s never been more deserving of the victory than she is this year.

Still, the favorite remains Carrie Underwood. She’s quickly become a favorite with Grammy voters, having won this category two years running, along with Best New Artist in 2007. She’s the nominee with the highest profile, and while “Last Name” is nowhere near the same league of “Jesus, Take the Wheel” and “Before He Cheats” in terms of artistry or impact, it was a big hit, something that the other four entries cannot claim.

If Underwood was nominated for “Just a Dream,” she’d have a mortal lock on this one. But the strength of the other nominees will at least keep this race competitive. If Underwood prevails, Grammy queen Alison Krauss better watch her back.

2008

  • Alison Krauss, “Simple Love”
  • Miranda Lambert, “Famous in a Small Town”
  • LeAnn Rimes, “Nothin’ Better to Do”
  • Carrie Underwood, “Before He Cheats”
  • Trisha Yearwood, “Heaven, Heartache and the Power of Love”

Looking at this lineup, you’d think that it was a golden age of female country artists, something akin to the mid-nineties. In reality, only one of these songs was a big radio hit, though three others managed to go top twenty. In terms of quality, however, this is the most consistent and thoroughly wonderful set of nominees this category has seen this century.  You’d have to go back to exactly 1999 to find a better lineup.

In a year when any winner would have been deserving, Underwood won for “Before He Cheats,” her second straight win for a signature mega-hit from her debut album.

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Discussion: iPod Check

This afternoon, it took me seventy minutes to get to my final and fifteen minutes to actually take it.   It was the traffic jam to end all traffic jams, requiring navigations of Brooklyn and Queens that were mind-numbingly convoluted.

What kept me from losing my temper?  My iPod.   Nothing quite like Todd Snider and Rodney Carrington to lighten the mood.

We haven’t had an iPod Check in a long time, so given that it was my sanity-saving device today, it’s as good a night as any.

No funny rules or complicated instructions here.   Just turn on your iPod/mp3 player and hit shuffle.

My first ten songs:

  1. The Offspring, “Why Don’t You Get a Job?”
  2. Restless Heart, “You Can Depend on Me”
  3. Whitney Houston, “Exhale (Shoop Shoop)”
  4. Johnny Cash, “Sunday Morning Coming Down”
  5. Madonna, “Act of Contrition”
  6. Iris Dement, “Childhood Memories”
  7. M.C. Hammer, “Pumps and a Bump”
  8. New Radicals, “Jehovah Made This”
  9. Depeche Mode, “Just Can’t Get Enough”
  10. Dolly Parton, “I Hope You’re Never Happy”

First ten country songs:

  1. Restless Heart, “You Can Depend On Me”
  2. Johnny Cash, “Sunday Morning Coming Down”
  3. Iris Dement, “Childhood Memories”
  4. Dolly Parton, “I Hope You’re Never Happy”
  5. Willie Nelson, “Back to Earth”
  6. Jo Dee Messina, “Not Going Down”
  7. Johnny Cash, “I’ve Been Everywhere”
  8. Dwight Yoakam, “Bury Me”
  9. Emmylou Harris, “Easy For You to Say”
  10. Kathy Mattea, “Lonely at the Bottom”

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CMA Flashback: Horizon Award (New Artist)

For a look back at the other major categories, visit our CMA Awards page.

2010

  • Luke Bryan
  • Easton Corbin
  • Jerrod Neimann
  • Chris Young
  • Zac Brown Band

Usually there isn’t this much turnover in this race unless most of last year’s nominees are ineligible.  This year, only one of the four eligible nominees from last year – Zac Brown Band – earns a nomination.  With their massive success and their multiple nominations, they’ve got an excellent shot at winning. Then again, Easton Corbin is elsewhere on the ballot, too. It could be a horse race.
2009

  • Randy Houser
  • Jamey Johnson
  • Jake Owen
  • Darius Rucker
  • Zac Brown Band

Thirteen years after winning the Best New Artist Grammy as part of Hootie & The Blowfish, Darius Rucker won the country music equivalent, adding an exclamation point to the most successful pop-to-country crossover in a generation.

lady-antebellum2008

  • Jason Aldean
  • Rodney Atkins
  • Lady Antebellum
  • James Otto
  • Kellie Pickler

The industry favorites Lady Antebellum became the fourth band in history to win this award, following Rascal Flatts, Dixie Chicks and Sawyer Brown.

2007

  • Jason Aldean
  • Rodney Atkins
  • Little Big Town
  • Kellie Pickler
  • Taylor Swift

In the year since winning the Horizon Award, Swift has solidified her position as the genre’s most successful rising star.  While her debut album hasn’t reached the sales heights of the first discs by previous winners Carire Underwood and Gretchen Wilson, Swift is still one of the genre’s only significant sellers.

2006

  • Miranda Lambert
  • Little Big Town
  • Sugarland
  • Josh Turner
  • Carrie Underwood

I had a sneaking suspicion that Josh Turner was going to take this home, but as I’ve said before, Carrie’s got the best pipes since Trisha Yearwood. That she’ was acknowledged for that at such an early stage of her career is pretty amazing. Somehow I think the thrill of winning Horizon was short-lived, as winning Female Vocalist the same night left that memory in the dust.

2005

  • Dierks Bentley
  • Big & Rich
  • Miranda Lambert
  • Julie Roberts
  • Sugarland

Four of these five were nominees again the following year, and all in categories besides just Horizon, though Lambert got another shot at that as well. I think Big & Rich and Sugarland are making the most interesting music, and they’re moving more units than Bentley, though he’s no slouch himself. The CMA showed good judgment this year.

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100 Greatest Women, #53: Jo Dee Messina

100 Greatest Women

#53

Jo Dee Messina

The first big post-Shania country star, Jo Dee Messina fully embodied the girl power movement of the late nineties, releasing catchy country-pop songs that were consistently from a strong woman’s point of view.

One of the few major country stars to hail from the northeast, she’s a Massachusetts native who moved to Nashville when she was nineteen. While doing office jobs during the day, she performed in talent shows and on the radio show Live at Libby’s.

Producer Bryan Gallimore heard her on the radio show and contacted her. They agreed to work together to secure her a record contract, and Messina became fast friends with another young hopeful, Tim McGraw. When McGraw broke through, he introduced Messina to his label executives at Curb. They signed Messina, and McGraw and Gallimore came on board as her producers.

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Jo Dee Messina, “I’m Done”

Dripping with bitterness and resignation, Jo Dee Messina’s new single “I’m Done” captures the anger and frustration that comes with being the back-up girl. Messina is the modern queen of the kiss-off song, and she’s wrote herself a beauty here. Righteous indignation never sounded so good.

Written by Jerry Flowers, Jo Dee Messina & Monty Powell

Grade: A-

Listen: I’m Done

Buy: I’m Done

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Jo Dee Messina, “Biker Chick”

Jo Dee Messina, “Biker Chick”

I couldn’t shake the feeling that I’d heard all of this before. Then suddenly, it came back to me.

“Cool Rider.”

Grade: C

Listen: Biker Chick

Buy: Biker Chick

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