Tag Archives: Merle Haggard

Single Review: Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, “It’s all Going to Pot”

Willie Nelson Merle Haggard It's all Going to Pot

“It’s all Going to Pot”
Willie Nelson & Merle Haggard

Written by Buddy Cannon, Jamey Johnson, and Larry Shell

Let’s answer all of the burning questions right away.

1. Do these two legends still sound great?  Yes.

2. Is it a real duet where they alternate verses and play off of each other?  Yes.

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Daily Top Five: Songs About Money

Shania Twain Ka-Ching!This week brought tax season to an end, and depending on how it went for you last year, you’ll be collecting a refund check or writing one out to the IRS instead.

Seems as good a time as any to share our five favorite songs about money!

Here ‘s my top five:

  1. Merle Haggard, “If We Make it Through December”
  2. John Anderson, “Money in the Bank”
  3. Todd Snider, “Broke”
  4. Shania Twain, “Ka-Ching!”
  5. Alabama, “40 Hour Week (For a Livin’)”

 

 

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The Twenty Best Albums of 1994

As 2014 comes to a close, the Country Universe staff has been collectively impressed by the number of quality albums that were released this year.  How many of those albums, however, will we still be listening to in twenty years?

We have that benefit of hindsight for the year 1994, and we’ve compiled our twenty favorite studio sets from that year.  At their time of release, some of our favorites were comeback albums from veteran artists, some were from current artists reaching new artistic and commercial peaks, and some were debut sets from artists that went on to become mainstays on country radio or in the Americana music scene that was just coming together twenty years ago.

What they all have in common is that each and every one of them still sounds great today, and they collectively show the wide breadth that the country music landscape was transforming into as the genre reached wider levels of popularity than it had ever seen before.

Randy Travis This is Me

#20
Randy Travis
This is Me

BF #11 | KJC #15 | LW #19

Travis’ legendary status was practically secure by 1994, but This is Me shows an artist neither resting on his laurels nor struggling to keep up with the young new talent of the era. The album serves up one solid song after another, with its best tracks delivering clever new takes on signature country themes, thus further advancing an already respectable legacy. – Ben Foster

Recommended Tracks: “Before You Kill Us All”, “This is Me”, “The Box”

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The Best Singles of 1994, Part 2: #30-#21

The list continues with big hits from Clay Walker, Neal McCoy, and Mary Chapin Carpenter, along with should’ve been hits from Carlene Carter and Merle Haggard.

confederate railroad daddy never was the cadillac kind

#30
“Daddy Never was the Cadillac Kind”
Confederate Railroad

Written by Dave Gibson and Bernie Nelson

KJC #10 | JK #22 | SG #39

Confederate Railroad made it big by balancing party anthems with thoughtful songs about growing up in the south.  This was their best “growing up” song, a thoughtful tribute from a son to his late father.  As tends to happen, the lessons taught to us in our youth aren’t fully appreciated or understood until it’s too late to truly say “thank you.”  – Kevin John Coyne

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100 Greatest Men: #1. Merle Haggard

Merle Haggard100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

The Poet of the Common Man.  Merle Haggard emerged from the Bakersfield music scene in the mid-sixties, and over the course of time, became the greatest man in the history of country music.

Born during the height of the Great Depression, the son of a honky tonk fiddler and a church-going mother, Haggard’s life was a hard one from early on.  When he lost his father at age nine, he rebelled to the point that much of his youth was spent in juvenile detention centers.  His only positive outlet was country music, and he listened to and studied obsessively the work of his heroes Bob Willis, Hank Williams, and Lefty Frizzell, all of whom would shape his singing and his songwriting.

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100 Greatest Men: #2. George Jones

George Jones100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Quite possibly country music’s most distinctive vocalist, George Jones wrapped his distinguished vocals around great songs for more than five decades.

Jones was born and raised in Texas, and his earliest musical tastes were shaped by the gospel he heard at church, and by the Carter Family songs he heard on the radio.   After his dad bought him a guitar, he would play on the streets of Beaumont for tips.   He was singing on the radio by his late teens, and after a brief stint in the military, he returned to Texas, where he was discovered by a local record producer named Pappy Daily.

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100 Greatest Men: #3. Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

He started out as an unconventional songwriter trying to be a conventional artist.  But when Willie Nelson let his hair down, he became a country legend for the ages.

Nelson was raised by his grandparents in Texas, who encouraged him to play the guitar and to write songs.  When his sister Bonnie married fiddle player Buddy Fletcher, Nelson joined his band as the frontman, staying with him until he graduated high school and did a brief stint in the Air Force.

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100 Greatest Men: #7. Buck Owens

Buck Owens100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

For many Americans, he was the guitar-slinging comedian that co-hosted Hee Haw.  But before he signed up for that popular show, he had already amassed a body of work that defined the sound of California country.

Owens was born in Texas and raised in Arizona, where he picked up the guitar from an early age.   He played gigs in Phoenix and other Arizona cities until his late teens, when he relocated to the city that would be synonymous with his sound and style: Bakersfield, California.

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100 Greatest Men: #8. Lefty Frizzell

Lefty Frizzell100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Lefty Frizzell just may be the most influential vocalist in country music history.  His signature honky-tonk style has been the foundational template for several generations of traditional country vocalists, smoothing out the twangy edges just enough to please the ears of mainstream audiences without compromising its hillbilly roots.

Frizzell was born in Texas, but moved to Arkansas at a young age. He earned the nickname Lefty in a schoolyard fight at the age of fourteen, and it followed him from that point on.  Though he was singing on the radio in his teens and performing locally, run-ins with the law sidelined his music career in the mid-forties.

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100 Greatest Men: #9. Bob Wills

Bob Wills100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Few styles of country music have been more hugely influential than Western Swing.   As the embodiment of that style, Bob Wills became one of the most influential country artists in history.

Born and raised in Texas, Wills was a virtuoso fiddle, guitar, and mandolin player by his teens.  Like many early country stars, he first made a name for himself playing dance halls across Texas.   More so than most country legends, Wills put a huge emphasis on having an excellent backing band.   His first group of players, the Wills Fiddle Band, became popular in the Fort Worth area, eventually earning their own radio show.   In honor of their sponsors, they renamed themselves the Light Crust Doughboys.

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