Randy Owen

A Tale of Two Tributes: Alabama

October 19, 2013 // 8 Comments

Alabama-Friends

Various Artists
Alabama & Friends

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To recognize the impact that Alabama has had on modern country music, you could consider their millions of albums sold, their hundreds of awards, their many #1 songs or their induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2005. You could also look at how the boys from Fort Payne, Ala. have the distinction of bringing something entirely new into country music.

Discussion: SoundScan Sound Off

December 17, 2008 // 30 Comments

In this era of rampant piracy and economic recession, things aren’t looking good for the music industry.   We don’t post too often about the business side of the music business here, as we tend to keep the focus on the music.   But the reality is that these numbers matter.  If Little Big Town’s second Equity album had performed as well as the first, the label might still be in business. It’s not all doom and gloom, as many artists go on to make their best music once they leave major labels.   But this Christmas, you can guarantee that some artists and record executives will be bracing for the New Year, while others are embracing it. Here’s a look at some totals for albums released in 2008, ranked by total sales (rounded to the nearest thousand): Taylor Swift, Fearless – 1,519,000 Sugarland, Love on the Inside – 1,179,000 George Strait, Troubadour Read More

Randy Owen, One on One

November 4, 2008 // 0 Comments

Randy Owen One on One As the lead singer of Alabama, Randy Owen guided the quartet with his rugged, yet appealing vocal style.  With the band retired from the road, Owen steps into the spotlight alone with his solo project, One on One. An elder statesman in contemporary country music, Owen is now embracing the challenge of courting to a youthful audience while still maintaining the signature style that defined his three decades as a hitmaker. Here, he’s far removed from his heyday as Alabama’s frontman, and the blue-collar rockers that defined the group’s Hall of Fame career are eschewed in favor of laidback grooves that fit well with Owen’s quietly soulful interpretations. Behind the boards for the album is conspicuous co-producer John Rich, recruited to command Owen’s comeback to the mainstream scene. The pair’s production choices swing from wonderfully subtle to poorly mismanaged, and those fluctuations in song sense make One on One a mixed bag of slow, seductive rhythms that rise and fall with the Read More

Randy Owen, “Like I Never Broke Her Heart”

June 30, 2008 // 12 Comments

Randy Owen, former lead singer of Alabama, is trying to make his way back onto country radio as a solo artist. Unfortunately, “Like I Never Broke Her Heart” lacks distinction both in lyrics and production. Owen sings from the perspective of a man who notices that his former lover is very happy with a new man. Despite the fact that he, apparently, treated her horribly, he observes with regret: “She loves you like I never broke her heart…I wonder where I went when I went too far.” This generic storyline is accompanied by an equally uninspiring production by John Rich, which showcases unnecessary electric guitar solos and an annoying background vocal track that repeats Owen’s second to last line in each chorus. Written by Mitzi Dawn, J. T. Harding and Shannon Lawson Grade: C Listen: Like I Never Broke Her Heart

Randy Owen, “Braid My Hair”

January 21, 2008 // 21 Comments

I wasn’t aware that Randy Owen was planning on doing any solo recordings, especially since Alabama is still putting out new studio albums.     That band’s long-standing association with St. Jude’s Children Hospital makes the subject of “Braid My Hair” less surprising than it normally would be: a young girl with cancer wishing to be strong again, so she can do things that other girls do, including braiding her hair. Cancer doesn’t surface in nearly as many songs as you’d expect, given just how widespread the impact of the disease is.   Owen, thankfully, sidesteps any cloying appeals to emotion with his delivery, which is sincere, not manipulative. Written by Christopher Gray & Brent Wilson Grade: B+ Listen:  Braid My Hair