Ronnie Dunn

Top 40 Singles of 2011, Part Four: #10-#1

January 5, 2012 // 12 Comments

The countdown concludes. Scroll down to the bottom to hear samples of each song and to share your comments.

Top 40 Singles of 2011, Part Four: #10-#1

#10
Love Done Gone
Billy Currington

Individual Rankings: #1 – Leeann; #1 – Jonathan; #13 – Tara

While many might get caught up in Billy Currington’s smoldering love songs, he’s really most effectively charming when he loosens up and has a little fun. While “Love Done Gone” is technically about lost love, Currington’s breezy performance along with the festive horns makes it seem more freeing than heartbreaking. As a result, the song turns out to be his most compelling since “Good Directions.” – Leeann Ward

Top 40 Singles of 2011, Part Two: #30-#21

January 2, 2012 // 2 Comments

The countdown continues. Scroll down to the bottom to hear samples of each song and to share your comments!

Top 40 Singles of 2011, Part Two: #30-#21

#30
Revelation Road
Shelby Lynne

Individual Rankings: #5 – Jonathan

It’s not for nothing that Tammy Wynette once claimed that Shelby Lynne had the best voice in country music, but, as Lynne has become increasingly subdued in the latter half of her career, she’s rarely explored the full range of her vocal talent. So when she unleashes that voice for the first time in a decade during the coda of “Revelation Road,” it may not be revelatory, but it sure is a most welcome return. – Jonathan Keefe

Single Review: Ronnie Dunn, “Bleed Red”

February 3, 2011 // 13 Comments

I’m in.

Ronnie Dunn’s first post-B&D single might be a kiss-and-make up song. Or it could be a call for world peace and greater humanity. Maybe it’s the turmoil in Egypt that has me leaning toward the latter interpretation.

Album Review: Randy Houser, They Call Me Cadillac

October 5, 2010 // 12 Comments

Randy Houser
They Call Me Cadillac

In a male dominated industry, it’s often difficult to hear distinction in the plethora of male voices on mainstream country radio. We do not have such a challenge with Randy Houser, however. Instead, Houser has a voice that rivals the soul and strength of Brooks and Dunn’s Ronnie Dunn. Regrettably, his debut album mainly suffered from production that detracted from his distinctive voice by placing heavy emphasis on the trending bombast of the times.