Carlene Carter

What are You Listening to? – 2014 Edition

May 18, 2014 // 23 Comments

Carlene Carter Carter GirlThere have been a lot of new releases in the past few weeks. What tracks are resonating with you the most?

Here are three of my current favorites:

Carlene Carter, “Me and the Wildwood Rose”

from the album Carter Girl

“Me and the Wildwood Rose” was always one of my favorite Carlene Carter tracks. Back when it was released in 1990, it had a wistful nostalgia for the grandmother that she had lost. In 2014, all of the other folks mentioned in the song, including her little sister “the Wildwood Rose”, have also passed on. The new version is so heavy with grief, it is only Carter’s effervescent spirit that keeps it from being too heavy.

Say What? Classic – Carlene Carter

February 15, 2011 // 4 Comments

From an interview with New Country in 1995:

It bugs me when I do something that I really think is great and they don’t acknowledge it at all. It’s kind of weird for me, but I don’t slit my wrists. What would kill me is if I did something that I didn’t believe in at all, that I hated, just because they said you’ll have a hit, and then it wasn’t a hit. That, to me, would be death.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #100-#76

August 15, 2010 // 13 Comments

Many a star was launched in the nineties, a few of them right out of the gate. This section includes the debut singles from Toby Keith, Jo Dee Messina, LeAnn Rimes, and Doug Stone, along with Grammy-winning hits by Alison Krauss and Dwight Yoakam.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #100-#76

The Battle Hymn of Love
Kathy Mattea & Tim O’Brien
1990 | Peak: #9


Wedding songs are typically made of the same fiber, but this one is a little different: it’s energized by burning conviction and fierce pledges. – Tara Seetharam

LeAnn Rimes
1996 | Peak: #10


Sure, the novelty of thirteen year-old Rimes’ prodigious Patsy imitation helped things along. But that unshakable yodeled hook would have made “Blue” a classic in any era of country music. – Dan Milliken

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #200-#176

August 2, 2010 // 25 Comments

The hits come from all over the place here. Breakthrough hits from Trace Adkins and Carlene Carter join one-hit wonders Brother Phelps and George Ducas. And alongside crafty covers of songs by sixties rock band The Searchers and nineties country artist Joy Lynn White, you can also find tracks from three diamond-selling country albums.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #200-#176

Carrying Your Love With Me
George Strait
1997 | Peak: #1


A traveler gets through his lonely nights on the sheer strength of love. It’s perhaps a little too saccharine for some, but the sweet melody and Strait’s understated vocals make the record work. – Tara Seetharam

Nothing’s News
Clint Black
1990 | Peak: #3


A man sits around in a bar “talking ’bout the good old times, bragging on how it used to be.” Simple premise, but the gorgeously melancholy melody and performance lift the record to Haggardly heights. – Dan Milliken

Discussion: Worst Album Titles?

July 27, 2010 // 31 Comments

We don’t do as many discussions as we used to at CU, and it’s possible that we already did this one. But seeing the title of this week’s #1 country album, I couldn’t resist:

Jerrod Niemann, Judge Jerrod & The Hung Jury

I’d call it juvenile, but I don’t think I would’ve laughed as a kid, either. But I’m sure some people found it funny.

Here are a few others that make me wince:

Pam Tillis, Above and Beyond the Doll of Cutey

I. Don’t. Get. It. “(You Just Want to Be) Weird”, indeed.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #300-#276

July 17, 2010 // 20 Comments

The list continues with appearances from artists who first surfaced in the eighties and continued to thrive into the nineties, like Reba McEntire and Patty Loveless, along with new stars from the nineties who would find greater success in the next decade, like Toby Keith and Brad Paisley.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #300-#276

Does He Love You
Reba McEntire with Linda Davis
1993 | Peak: #1


This two-female duet was a gamble at the time of its release, but it offers such a brilliant fusion of perspectives that it’s hard to imagine why. The song fleshes out the range of emotions that the two women are experiencing –from pain to longing to self-doubt– and culminates in one shared question that they’ll never know the answer to: “does he love you like he’s been loving me?” – Tara Seetharam

Grammy Flashback: Best Female Country Vocal Performance

January 25, 2009 // 23 Comments

Revised and Updated for 2009 While the Grammys have honored country music from the very first ceremony in 1959, they did not begin honoring by gender until 1965, when the country categories were expanded along with the other genre categories. This is a look back at the Best Female Country Vocal Performance category. It was first awarded in 1965, an included single competing with albums until the Best Country Album category was added in 1995. When an album is nominated, it is in italics, and a single track is in quotation marks. I’ve often made the case that female artists were making the best music in the 1990s, and the Grammys did a great job nominating songs and albums that were ignored at the CMA and ACM awards, which is not surprising, given that those shows have so few categories that are actually for songs and albums. As usual, we Read More

iPod Check: They Call it Country

January 3, 2009 // 32 Comments

We’re making iPod Check a weekly discussion feature this year, with a bit of a different spin each week. This week, check out the “Country” genre on your music list and post the first ten songs that play. Here are my ten, out of 5,626 in total: 1. k.d. lang, “Pullin’ Back the Reins” 2. Johnny Cash, “I’m Going to Memphis” 3. Sugarland, “Already Gone” 4. Dolly Parton, “Don’t Let Me Cross Over” 5. Trisha Yearwood, “Nothin’ About You is Good For Me” 6. Carlene Carter, “Two Sides to Every Woman” 7. Johnny Cash, “Thirteen” 8. Kenny Rogers, “I Don’t Call Him Daddy” 9. Emmylou Harris, “Tennessee Waltz” 10. Loretta Lynn, “I Believe”

Discussion: 21st Century Trio

November 30, 2008 // 24 Comments

One of the landmarks of Dolly Parton’s career was the Trio album, her platinum-selling collaboration with Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris.   It was one of the few country albums in history to receive a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year, and it won every major industry award, including the ACM for Top Album. Just as compelling was Parton’s collaboration with Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette, which went gold despite zero support from country radio.   After another collaboration with Ronstadt and Harris in the late nineties, there hasn’t been another collaboration of the sort from any major country artists. I think this concept needs to be updated for the 21st Century.  My vote is for a Lorrie Morgan, Pam Tillis and Carlene Carter album that fulfills the promise of their headlining 1996 tour. Which three artists would you like to see put out a trio album?

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