Doug Supernaw

The Best Singles of 1993, Part Three: #20-#11

July 27, 2015 // 8 Comments

As we enter the top half of the list, signature hits by some of the era’s biggest stars rub elbows with a pair of breakthrough singles and an overlooked release by a future superstar. You’ll also find out, in case you’ve been wondering for the past 22 years, just what Dwight Yoakam sneers at the end of one of his classic records.   #20 “Soon” Tanya Tucker Written by Casey Kelly and Bob Regan Peak: #2 #13 – LW | #22 – JK | #28 – KJC | #30 – BF Cheating songs that successfully make us feel compassion for the other woman are a rarity, but “Soon” manages to make us root for the woman who finds herself in a losing cycle, one that she finally finds the strength to stop. Tanya Tucker’s sympathetic performance and the song’s soothing melody invite us to feel compassion for the woman in Read More

Daily Top Five: Father’s Day

June 21, 2015 // 14 Comments

Regular posts, including single reviews, will begin again tomorrow. In the meantime, today’s Daily Top Five is perfect for the day in question. What are your five favorite country songs about being a dad? It can be the experience of being the father or being the child, or just songs that you like that don’t bear much relation to your actual relationship with your father or your child. Here’s my list: Sawyer Brown, “The Walk” Reba McEntire, “The Greatest Man I Never Knew” Alan Jackson, “Drive (For Daddy Gene)” Loretta Lynn, “They Don’t Make ‘Em Like My Daddy” Doug Supernaw, “I Don’t Call Him Daddy”

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #150-#126

August 9, 2010 // 16 Comments

Signature hits, breakthrough hits, and why-weren’t-they-hits abound in this entry.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #150-#126

#150
Gone Country
Alan Jackson
1994 | Peak: #1

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A perfect time capsule of the boom times, as Jackson wryly notes all of those genre-hoppers who saw dollar signs in the growing country music scene. Funny how they didn’t arrive on radio until a decade later. – Kevin Coyne

#149
I Want to Be Loved Like That
Shenandoah
1993 | Peak: #3

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Sometimes the deepest understanding of love comes from what you see around you. The narrator in this song won’t settle for anything less than the unwavering love he’s witnessed in his life, and his examples are stunning in the way they slice straight to the core of love, to the bond that can’t be broken by the physical world. This is one of the purest tributes to love I’ve ever heard. – Tara Seetharam

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #325-#301

July 14, 2010 // 12 Comments

The first quarter of the countdown comes to a close, highlighted by excellent comeback attempts by T. Graham Brown, Emmylou Harris, and Willie Nelson.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #325-#301

#325
He Would Be Sixteen
Michelle Wright
1992 | Peak: #31

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Sometimes the choices that you make linger forever. Here, a woman in her thirties drives past a high school football game, and her mind wanders to the painful void left in her heart from the son she gave up for adoption. – Kevin Coyne

#324
It Matters to Me
Faith Hill
1995 | Peak: #1

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Faith Hill’s sophomore album is a surprisingly deep set, filled with candid insights into different womens’ lives. The title track represents that spirit well, as a woman articulates the differences in her and her man’s relationship approaches with impressive precision. – Dan Milliken