Tag Archives: Frank Sinatra

100 Greatest Men: #44. Glen Campbell

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

A young talent from Arkansas that developed from an in-demand session musician into a frontman for the ages.

Glen Campbell played guitar from the age of four.  He picked up instrumental guidance from jazz records while developing his vocal skills at church.   By his teenage years, he was already playing in country bands throughout Arkansas, and by age eighteen, he had his own country band called the Western Wranglers.

Looking for work, he moved to California in his early twenties, where he became a popular session musician, playing on records by Elvis Presley, Merle Haggard, Frank Sinatra, and the Monkees.  He played live gigs backing up established artists, while also pushing his own solo career, which was aided greatly by his touring with the Beach Boys.   Their Capitol label signed Campbell to a deal, and after working diligently throughout the sixties, he would end the decade as a huge star.

Campbell released a string of classic hits and albums from 1967-1969, including several gold singles and LPs.   His dual success on the pop and country charts with “By the cialis tablets foreign Time I Get to Phoenix”, “Wichita Lineman”, and “Galveston”, made him a household name, and he dominated at all three major industry award shows.   His By the Time I Get to Phoenix set remains one of the only country albums in history to win the Grammy for Album of the Year, and his CBS show,  The Glen Campbell Good Time Hour, further cemented his popularity.

The hits slowed down as the seventies rolled in, though Campbell had well-received duets with Bobbie Gentry and Anne Murray.   Alcohol and substance abuse contributed to this decline, but despite battling those demons, he managed a brief comeback in the middle of the decade.   A pair of crossover hits topped both the country and pop charts: “Rhinestone Cowboy” and “Southern Nights.”  Both became signature songs for him, and helped get his radio career back on track.

Campbell would remain an inconsistent but regular presence on country radio until the late eighties, a decade that saw him conquer his addictions and become a born-again Christian.  In the nineties, he penned his autobiography, Rhinestone Cowboy, and opened a wildly popular theater in Branson, Missouri.   While this decade was intended to begin his retirement, Campbell remained a passionate live performer, and he won several awards for his inspirational albums.

Campbell was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2005, but soon demonstrated that his music career wasn’t quite through yet. In 2008, he returned to Capitol records and released Meet Glen Campbell, his first new country album in fifteen years.   A diagnosis with Alzheimer’s inspired 2011’s farewell project, Ghost on the Canvas, which was hailed as one of his finest works.   He followed the album with a bittersweet farewell tour that is intended to bring an end to his public appearances upon his completion.

Essential Singles:

  • Gentle on My Mind, 1967
  • By the Time I Get to Phoenix, 1967
  • I Wanna Live, 1968
  • Wichita Lineman, 1968
  • Galveston, 1969
  • Rhinestone Cowboy, 1975
  • Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.), 1975
  • Southern Nights, 1977

Essential Albums:

  • Gentle on My Mind, 1967
  • By the Time I Get to Phoenix, 1967
  • Wichita Lineman, 1968
  • Galveston, 1969
  • Rhinestone Cowboy, 1975
  • Southern Nights, 1977
  • Ghost on the Canvas, 2011

Next: #43. Roger Miller

Previous: #45. Tim McGraw

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

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Retro Single Review: George Strait, “You’re Something Special to Me”

1985 | Peak: #4

Deceptively simple.

“You’re Something Special to Me” is so laid back that it’s easy to miss the craftsmanship.  As Strait channels a young Merle Haggard, a slow western swing arrangement surrounds him with warmth.

When people say he’s country music’s Sinatra, this is what they’re talking about.

Written by David Anthony

Grade: A

Next: Nobody in His Right Mind Would’ve Left Her

Previous: The Chair

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The 30 Day Song Challenge: Day 23

Today’s category is…

An Oldie But Goodie.

Here are the staff picks:

Kevin Coyne: “Tell It to the Rain” –  The 4 Seasons

You can tell it’s the mid-sixties because they’re dabbling a bit with production gimmicks.  I think it’s their coolest-sounding record, one of their best compositions, and Frankie Valli at the peak of his vocal prowess.

Leeann Ward: “Baby Blue” – George Strait

Since I picked on George strait for “Check Yes or No”, it seems only fair that I spotlight one of my favorites by him. Anyone who claims that he doesn’t sing with emotion should listen to this one again.

Dan Milliken: “Up Above My Head” – Sister Rosetta Tharpe

One of Elvis’ heroes. Check this out toot-sweet.

Tara Seetharam: “Someone to Watch Over Me” – Frank Sinatra

Or anything by my man, Frank. Most people don’t know that after country music, this is the genre that feels the most innate to me.

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The 30 Day Song Challenge: Day 8

Today’s category is…

A Song That You Know All the Words To.

Staff Picks:

Kevin Coyne: “My Way” – Frank Sinatra

There’s gotta be a thousand songs I know all of the words to, but I’ll pick this one because it took me a while to anticipate all of the odd rhymes with “my way”, most especially the line about “each careful step along the byway.”  Plus I’m just going through a big Sinatra phase these days.

Leeann Ward: No Selection

When I was a kid, I was great at memorizing words, because I’d sing along with songs all the time. Somewhere in my early adulthood, however, I stopped singing around people, therefore, stopped singing along with songs as much. I don’t have a dramatic reason that I can pinpoint for not singing in front of people anymore (I can carry a tune pretty well, actually.), but I do know that not doing so has limited my ability for memorizing words to songs. This is the long way of admitting that I no longer know all the words to a song without having the song playing. Sad, isn’t it?

Dan Milliken: “Natalie’s Rap” – The Lonely Island featuring Natalie Portman

This 2006 SNL classic casts recent Oscar winner Portman as a staggeringly foul-mouthed gangsta rapper. A Dan’s-car staple.

Tara Seetharam: “Any Man of Mine” – Shania Twain

…right down to the shimmying, shaking and earthquake-making.

 

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