Posts Tagged ‘Tommy Collins’

Retro Single Review: George Strait, "If You Ain't Lovin' (You Ain't Livin')"

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

1988 | Peak: #1

Strait’s fifteenth #1 single, and eighth in a row, was a cover of a #2 Faron Young hit from 1954.

It features Strait singing in such an exaggerated twang that the entire proceedings feel more campy than country.  You’re much better off sticking to the original, which is an entertaining representative of the country music from that time.

It’s a testament

to Strait’s star power that he got this to go higher on the chart the second time around, but I can’t imagine he recorded it with the idea that it was anything more than album filler.

Written by Tommy Collins

Grade: B-

Next: Baby’s Gotten Good at Goodbye

Previous:  Baby Blue

100 Greatest Men: #70. Ferlin Husky

Saturday, February 25th, 2012

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Equal parts classic country singer and brilliant comedian, Ferlin Husky was one of the consummate all-around entertainers.

Born and raised in Missouri, he learned guitar from his uncle.  The music bug led him to drop out of high school, and he played honky-tonks at night while working blue collar jobs by day.  During World War II, he entertained troops for five years.  It was during this time that he created the character Simon Crum, a hayseed hillbilly singer.  He would go on to play that character on record and on stage for many years.

He gained prominence in the burgeoning southern California country music scene as a musician, performer, and disc jockey.  His searing guitar work, featured on the studio recordings of Tommy Collins, helped shape the Bakersfield sound that would later expand the boundaries of country music.

In addition to the Crum moniker, he also performed under the stage name Terry Preston from 1948-1953, but he went back to his birth name by the time he started having major hits for Capitol records in the early fifties.   His breakthrough hit was a duet with fellow honky-tonker Jean Shepard. Their first collaboration, “A Dear John Letter”, topped the charts in 1953.

During the fifties, Husky was remarkably prolific.   He had two separate contracts with Capitol Records, scoring hits as both Ferlin Husky and his now-classic character, Simon Crum.   He appeared on radio and television, and even had bit parts in more than a dozen films.   He scored a huge crossover pop hit with “Gone” in 1957.

The string of hits continued in the sixties, the most notable being “Wings of a Dove”, which went on to become a country gospel standard covered by countless artists.  He earned great marks as a live performer, and the comedic talents he honed as Simon Crum were also put to use through mimicking the big country stars of the day.

He was also a mentor to several important country music figures, including Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and Dallas Frazier.  His struggling as a young artist was something he always remembered, so he made a point to give a helping hand to young talent.

His health required him to cut back on performances from the seventies onward, but when he did perform on the Opry or on the road, he remained a popular draw.  A year before his passing, he was able to see his legacy secured, as he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2010.

Essential Singles:

  • A Dear John Letter (with Jean Shepard), 1953
  • Gone, 1957
  • Country Music is Here to Stay (Simon Crum), 1958
  • Wings of a Dove, 1960
  • Once, 1967
  • Just For You, 1968

Essential Albums:

  • Songs of Home and Heart, 1956
  • Boulevard of Broken Dreams, 1957
  • Born to Lose, 1959
  • The Heart and Soul of Ferlin Husky, 1963

Next: #69. Travis Tritt

Previous: #71. Johnny Paycheck

100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

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