Author Archives: Kevin John Coyne

Single Review: Trisha Yearwood, “Prize Fighter” (with Kelly Clarkson)

Trisha Yearwood Kelly Clarkson Prize Fighter

“Prize Fighter” (with Kelly Clarkson)
Trisha Yearwood

Written by Jessi Alexander, Sarah Buxton, and Ross Copperman

Yes, it’s been more than seven years since Trisha Yearwood has released a proper single.  Yes, it was worth the wait.

“Prize Fighter” is uplifting, inspirational, and powerful.   It showcases Yearwood’s still flawless voice, an instrument that is effective at every setting between whisper and shout, and is always properly calibrated to the material it delivers.    It’s a credit to Kelly Clarkson that she can even keep up with Yearwood, and her contributions to the track are complementary, if not entirely necessary.

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Album Review: Tim McGraw, Sundown Heaven Town

Tim mcgraw sundown heaven town

Tim McGraw
Sundown Heaven Town

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Tim McGraw returning to form is the musical equivalent of reconnecting with an old friend, where spending a little time with them suddenly reminds you why you were such good friends in the first place.

Sundown Heaven Town is McGraw’s strongest album in ten years, his best since 2004’s award-winning Live Like You Were Dying, which I still consider his strongest collection to date.  In the years since that collection, he’s been chasing trends more than setting them.  Each album had its strong moments, but always fewer than the previous one.  His simple formula – find a great song, sing it with enthusiasm, and keep the clutter in check – got lost along the way.

It’s not a coincidence that all of his recent awards attention have been for collaborations, usually with artists who hit the scene well after him.   He’s been chasing trends, not setting them.

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Single Review: Carrie Underwood, “Something in the Water”

carrie-underwood-something-in-the-water

“Something in the Water”

Carrie Underwood

Written by Chris DeStefano, Brett James, and Carrie Underwood

If anybody’s going to sing a song about the power of the water to cleanse your soul, it should be Carrie Underwood.   Her voice and her presence on record are enough to wash country listeners’ ears clean from all the dreck we’re being assaulted with these days.

Underwood previews her upcoming hits collection by revisiting a theme that she’s explored before, but with a wisdom and maturity that can only come from life experience.  “Something in the Water” shifts the transformative experience of “Jesus, Take the Wheel” into the first person, a sign, along with her co-writing credit, of how much more personal ownership she now takes over her work.  So as great as that first hit was, it’s the new release that throbs with urgency and intensity, moving the spiritual experience from something philosophical into something viscerally real.

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Single Review: Florida Georgia Line, “Anything Goes”

Florida Georgia Line Anything Goes

“Anything Goes”

Florida Georgia Line

Written by Felix McTeigue, Chris Tompkins, and Craig Wiseman

A piece of trash so shamelessly awful that it is beyond parody.   Beyond comprehension.  Almost beyond comment.

To observe that Florida Georgia Line’s work barely qualifies as country music  seems pointless, given that it barely qualifies as music in the first place.  It’s noise.  Loud, irritating, soulless, pandering, patronizing noise.   This record is so bad that it should end with an apology and a voucher for time lost that the listener can never get back.

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Single Review: Tim McGraw, “Shotgun Rider”

Tim McGraw Shotgun Rider“Shotgun Rider”

Tim McGraw

Written by Marv Green, Hillary Lindsey, and Troy Verges

Tim McGraw’s been getting his groove back lately.  Much of his new album, Sundown Heaven Town, recalls the sound of his biggest turn-of-the-century hits without sounding dated.

“Shotgun Rider” is a great example of this, having that wistful, floating on air quality that made “Just to See You Smile” and “For a Little While” so infectious.  Sure, he’s singing about riding around town in his truck with a pretty girl.  Hardly groundbreaking lyrical territory these days.

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Single Review: Blake Shelton, “Neon Light”

Blake Shelton Neon Light“Neon Light”

Blake Shelton

Written by Andrew Dorff, Mark Irwin, and Josh Kear

Brooks & Dunn made an entire career out of honky tonk puns and play on words.  “Neon Light” is a throwback to those songs, with Blake Shelton previewing his new album with a song built around there being “a neon light at the end of the tunnel.”

To his credit, Shelton plays it subtle, with the song not having that arena-in-mind noisiness that has come to define today’s country music.  But the song never quite gets out of first gear, either.  Sure, the song didn’t need power chords and hair band chants.   But it certainly would benefit from more aggressive fiddle and steel guitar.

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2014 CMA Nominations

This year’s CMA nominees are the best in years, with multiple nominations for Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves, and Brandy Clark.  Country radio may still be shunning women, but their embrace by CMA voters suggests that the industry knows who is really leading the way in the genre these days.

George Strait ACMEntertainer of the Year

  • Luke Bryan
  • Miranda Lambert
  • Blake Shelton
  • George Strait
  • Keith Urban

Who’s In:  Miranda Lambert, Keith Urban

Who’s Out: Jason Aldean, Taylor Swift

George Strait, a surprise winner last year, is nominated again in a year that includes his record-shattering final concert.   Miranda Lambert’s domination of this year’s nominations extends to the big category, where she competes for the first time since 2010.

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100 Greatest Men: #1. Merle Haggard

Merle Haggard100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

The Poet of the Common Man.  Merle Haggard emerged from the Bakersfield music scene in the mid-sixties, and over the course of time, became the greatest man in the history of country music.

Born during the height of the Great Depression, the son of a honky tonk fiddler and a church-going mother, Haggard’s life was a hard one from early on.  When he lost his father at age nine, he rebelled to the point that much of his youth was spent in juvenile detention centers.  His only positive outlet was country music, and he listened to and studied obsessively the work of his heroes Bob Willis, Hank Williams, and Lefty Frizzell, all of whom would shape his singing and his songwriting.

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100 Greatest Men: #2. George Jones

George Jones100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

Quite possibly country music’s most distinctive vocalist, George Jones wrapped his distinguished vocals around great songs for more than five decades.

Jones was born and raised in Texas, and his earliest musical tastes were shaped by the gospel he heard at church, and by the Carter Family songs he heard on the radio.   After his dad bought him a guitar, he would play on the streets of Beaumont for tips.   He was singing on the radio by his late teens, and after a brief stint in the military, he returned to Texas, where he was discovered by a local record producer named Pappy Daily.

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100 Greatest Men: #3. Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson100 Greatest Men: The Complete List

He started out as an unconventional songwriter trying to be a conventional artist.  But when Willie Nelson let his hair down, he became a country legend for the ages.

Nelson was raised by his grandparents in Texas, who encouraged him to play the guitar and to write songs.  When his sister Bonnie married fiddle player Buddy Fletcher, Nelson joined his band as the frontman, staying with him until he graduated high school and did a brief stint in the Air Force.

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