Paul Overstreet

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #150-#126

August 9, 2010 // 16 Comments

Signature hits, breakthrough hits, and why-weren’t-they-hits abound in this entry.

400 Greatest Singles of the Nineties: #150-#126

#150
Gone Country
Alan Jackson
1994 | Peak: #1

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A perfect time capsule of the boom times, as Jackson wryly notes all of those genre-hoppers who saw dollar signs in the growing country music scene. Funny how they didn’t arrive on radio until a decade later. – Kevin Coyne

#149
I Want to Be Loved Like That
Shenandoah
1993 | Peak: #3

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Sometimes the deepest understanding of love comes from what you see around you. The narrator in this song won’t settle for anything less than the unwavering love he’s witnessed in his life, and his examples are stunning in the way they slice straight to the core of love, to the bond that can’t be broken by the physical world. This is one of the purest tributes to love I’ve ever heard. – Tara Seetharam

Get Keith Urban’s “Song for Dad” for free on Amazon

June 21, 2009 // 3 Comments

As children, it’s common to think that we’ll never be like our parents. In some cases, we think we’ll never do the annoying or strange things that our parents did, as Brad Paisley sang about in “Yes You Will”, and there are other times when we think that we’ll never be as smart or as good as our parents. If we’re lucky, there comes a day when we see our parents in ourselves and can either eradicate certain behaviors and traits or embrace them, depending on the similarities we see.

In Keith Urban’s, “Song for Dad”, he celebrates the similarities that he realizes exist between him and his dad. Likewise, he hopes that he becomes more like his dad as other circumstances arise, particularly when he himself becomes a father. In a similar sentiment to Paul Overstreet’s “Seeing My Father in Me”, Urban embraces being like his father and is grateful for the legacy.