Category Archives: Single Reviews

Single Review: Darius Rucker, “Radio”

220px-RadioDariusRuckerDarius Rucker celebrates the radio with his current hit, simply titled “Radio.”

It’s tolerable enough, more tastefully produced than your average country radio hit, but it never quite overcomes the fact that its territory is one that other artists have covered much better in the past. (Exhibits A, B, C) The lyrics fail to rise above rote scenes of a nameless, faceless narrator driving down the highway with his nameless, faceless friends, and parking his truck beneath the stars to get cozy with his nameless, faceless girlfriend. The whole of the song is weighed down by a general sense of non-distinction, reflected in its generic one-word title.

Unfortunately, the dynamics aren’t strong enough to compensate. The melody is dull and lifeless, and Rucker’s performance is forgettable. The end result is a song that might not be bad enough to be an immediate station-changer, but nor is there anything here that would inspire me to ‘turn it up, turn it up to 10…’

Written by Darius Rucker, Luke Laird and Ashley Gorley

Grade: C+

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Single Review: Cole Swindell, “Chillin’ It”

Cole Swindell Chillin' ItHere’s the dilemma.

Cole Swindell has turned in an excellent record by many measurable standards.  It’s well-paced, he’s got some charisma behind the mic, it’s identifiably country, and intelligently structured.  Any song these days that has a clear beginning, middle, and end, and also manages to get it all done in under four minutes, feels like manna from heaven.

But all of this is in service to the most played-out, increasingly insufferable, and remarkably unnecessary country song concept: guy and girl hanging out in the country,  love and liquor in tow.

It’s a bit like an exquisite painting of dogs playing poker.  Great technique, ridiculous subject.

Written by Shane Minor and Cole Swindell

Grade: B-

 

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Single Review: Keith Urban, “Cop Car”

Keith Urban Cop CarOne hallmark of a great singer is the ability to suspend the listener’s disbelief.

The storyline of “Cop Car” is very far-fetched, one of those Nashville compositions that takes fantastical lengths to try and tell the story of a young couple falling in love.   In this case, they’re doing so right after being arrested for trespassing, while in handcuffs in the back seat of a police car.

Keith Urban’s heartfelt delivery and careful choice of what lines to emphasize keep the proceedings grounded.  He’s so effective at capturing the feeling of falling in love that the specifics of the event surrounding the moment are appropriately secondary to the emotions at play.

I don’t believe the story, but I believe him.

Written by Zach Crowell, Sam Hunt, and Matt Jenkins

Grade: B+

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Single Review: David Nail, “Whatever She’s Got”

David Nail Whatever She's GotIs “Whatever She’s Got” really just David Nail doing whatever he’s got to do to stay in the game?

Nail is one of the most distinctive and substantive new voices to emerge in recent years, especially among the crop of younger male artists.  He’s had more false starts than most, going through two labels in eleven years and having moderate to major hits, but not building up enough momentum to string a few together.

“Whatever She’s Got” is certainly his biggest hit to date, as it’s his first to reach gold status.   It’s so beneath his talent, though.  As generic as they come, it’s hard to believe it’s being sung by the voice behind “The Sound of a Million Dreams.”

But it’s working for him, I guess, and his upcoming album has a Brandy Clark co-write and a duet with Lee Ann Womack.   Here’s hoping that “Whatever She’s Got” gets him a good enough foot in the door that he can actually walk through it this time, and sneak some material worthy of this talent in with him.

Written by Jon Nite and Jimmy Robbins

Grade: C

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Single Review: Jason Aldean, “When She Says Baby”

Jason Aldean When She Says BabyWhen Jason Aldean wraps his voice around compelling material, the results are magical.

But more often than not, Aldean is delivering mediocre material.  “When She Says Baby” is a great example of how he can take a pedestrian, paint-by-numbers song and make it a little more interesting.  He plays with the speed of the lyrics in the chorus, all while keeping in time with the music behind him.  He adds a working man’s frustrated exhaustion as an undercurrent when the lyrics bemoan the daily grind, and effortlessly switches to the relief of a man who has a great woman to come home to, just as soon as the lyric switches to being about her.

But when a guy can do so much with so little, even a moderately pleasurable listening experience like this one leaves but one question lingering after the music fades:  “Why did he record this?”

Written by Rhett Akins and Ben Hayslip

Grade: C

 

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Single Review: Brad Paisley, “The Mona Lisa”

Brad Paisley The Mona LisaNow this is how you write a love song!

Brad Paisley’s had a lot of hit love songs over the years, many of which I’ve found irritating because they are either blithely condescending (“To the world, you’re nothing, but to me, you’re the world!”) or downright insulting (“I love the little moments where you do something stupid!”)

On “The Mona Lisa”, he opts for humility instead, and knocks it out of the park.   He compares his own purpose in life to being the frame that holds the Mona Lisa, serving as nothing but the backdrop for the jaw-droppingly awesome lady he just feels lucky to have.   Couple that with an incredibly fresh production, which showcases his guitar prowess and a remarkably alive vocal performance, and you’ve got one of his greatest singles to date.

Written by Chris DuBois and Brad Paisley

Grade: A

 

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Single Review: Eric Paslay, “Friday Night”

Eric Paslay Friday NightA breakthrough single that’s as notable for what it isn’t as for what it is.

“Friday Night” is nothing special in terms of lyrical content, and while Paslay is a competent singer, there’s nothing on the track that indicates he’s the next Keith Urban, or even the next Blake Shelton.   But he’s learned a few lessons along the way about what not to do.  The arrangement is simple, the musicianship clean and crisp, and the banjo drives the hook, rather than loud electric guitars or cumbersome percussion.

But I think what I like the best about “Friday Night” is its brevity.  Clocking in at just under three minutes, Paslay’s single ends a little abruptly, just when you think it’s going to devolve into an endless chorus with louder vocals and busier instrumentation.   It’s a production approach that makes a great song go on for too long, and a tolerable one become insufferable.

So kudos to Eric Paslay for not wearing out his welcome the first time around.

Written by Rob Crosby, Rose Falcon, and Eric Paslay

Grade: B

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Single Review: Jamie Lynn Spears, “How Could I Want More”

Jamie-Lynn-Spears-How-Could-I-Want-MoreSo… this is coming from pop idol Britney Spears’ 22-year-old younger sister who starred in a teen sitcom on Nickelodeon, and who became a tabloid favorite thanks to a controversial teen pregnancy. By all immediate expectations, her debut country single should be a disaster, and I should be making a stale pun out of the song’s title, right?

Only it isn’t a disaster. It’s well written, competently sung, and backed by a confident, un-fussy production that unmistakably identifies it as a country record. No disastrous attempts at power notes, no wall of thrashing guitars – just simple, gimmick-free, no-frills storytelling with generous amounts of country instrumentation. A pleasant surprise coming from a figure who could easily coast along on name recognition.

It’s unfortunate that “How Could I Want More” is hindered by a few clichés (“Treats me like a princess,” “Let’s me have it my way,” etc.), but the gaps are filled in with a fully realized melody and a tastefully restrained vocal. One might even hear shades of Deana Carter in Spears’ vocal stylings – poised, subtle, sincere, and with a hint of twang.

We’ll have to wait and see if Spears’ full-length debut country album, due out later this year, will bring her any closer to the potential suggested by this single. But if “How Could I Want More” is a sign of an artist taking her cues from country’s finest storytellers of the nineties, I will gladly welcome the younger Spears sibling into the country fold with open arms.

Written by Jamie Lynn Spears and Rivers Rutherford

Grade: B+

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Single Review: Florida Georgia Line, “Stay”

Florida Georgia Line StayWhile I waiting for the YouTube video to load, they played a 30-second commercial for the Duck Dynasty Christmas album, which apparently has the reality show stars singing Christmas standards while ducks quack along with them.  It sounded better than “Stay.”

Cheap shot? Perhaps. The truth is, I’ve avoided writing about Florida Georgia Line as much as possible, as I can’t remember an act I felt so tremendously indifferent to.  Ten years ago, I’d be angry about their prominence, but mainstream country music has lowered its standards so much at this point that it seems totally normal that a song written and sung this poorly could be a big hit by an award show dominating act.

The reigning CMA Vocal Duo of the Year have covered a mediocre track from a little known rock band called Black Stone Cherry*, and now it’s their latest single. I believe it’s already a hit.  This is the new normal.  Have fun.

Written by Black Stone Cherry and Joey Moi

Grade: D

*Artists with better songs called “Stay” that could’ve been covered instead include: David BowieAlison KraussLisa Loeb, Pink Floyd, Rihanna featuring Mikky Ekko, Shakespear’s Sister, Sugarland, U2, and Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs. Just to name a few.

 

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Single Review: Parmalee, “Carolina”

Parmalee CarolinaI think I’ve discovered a virtue of rock bands that choose to go country.  They feel a need to dial it back a bit, so we end up with a less cluttered, more straightforward performance.

There’s nothing distinguishingly country about “Carolina”, which makes it stand out among a lot of what’s on country radio right now.  But here’s the rub. It stands out because it’s not as garishly loud as the rock wannabes up and down the radio dial right now.   They don’t try as hard as Darius Rucker or even Sheryl Crow to make it at least sound like they’re seriously attempting country music, but maybe less loud rock music is the best we can hope for these days.

So, in case you’re pining for the days of Third Eye Blind and such, here you go.  They’re called Parmalee.

Written by Rick Beato, Barry Knox, Joshua McSwain, Matt Thomas, and Scott Thomas

Grade: C

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